District 1 Clean California

Envisioning What’s Possible

Trash has plagued California’s streets and highways for decades. Clean California proposes significant investments in litter collection, community engagement and education to ultimately transform unsightly roadsides into spaces of pride for all Californians. This is truly a statewide effort with potential projects in all 58 counties and with a third of the funds going directly to cities, counties, tribes and transit agencies to clean local streets and public spaces. 

For more information about Clean California, including California’s Adopt-A-Highway program, local grant programs, and career opportunities, or to submit a Customer Service Request (CSR) form to report litter, graffiti or maintenance issues, please visit Clean CA.

Program Benefits

Icon of a person sitting, facing their laptop.

Create career opportunities and jobs for veterans, students, artists, people experiencing homelessness, and also for those re-entering society from incarceration

Icon of a highway receding into the distance.

Significantly reduce litter along state highways, local roads, tribal land, parks, pathways and transit centers

Icon of a basket with recyclable bottles and cans in it.

Beautify our state’s transportation network through art and litter clean-up projects in underserved, rural and urban communities throughout the state

District 1 Clean California Programs

Adopt-A-Highway lets you contribute to your community by keeping local highways free of litter. The Clean California initiative adds incentives to the program. Visit Clean California's Adopt a Highway page for details.

Visit the District 1 Adopt-A-Highway Map

The Clean California Local Grant Program is funded with approximately $296 million for local communities to beautify and improve local streets, roads, tribal lands, parks, pathways, and transit centers. Visit Clean California's Local Grants page for information about the projects and details about the grant process. 

Caltrans will locally fund seven projects in District 1 to remove trash, create jobs, and engage communities to transform local spaces. The grants are part of Governor Newsom's Clean California initiative, a sweeping $1.1 billion, multiyear clean-up effort led by Caltrans. 

Local partners were able to secure $11.5 million in grant funding for community enhancements to beautify public spaces in District 1. 

District 1 Clean California Local Grant Program Projects:

  • City of Clearlake's Downtown Beautification and Clean-up will benefit an underserved area by upgrading safety features and mitigating litter and illegal dumping issues. 
  • City of Rio Dell's Gateway Beautification project adds a sense of community by updating the town's main street by replacing unhealthy trees in the median, upgrading the irrigation, and revitalizing a local park. 
  • City of Rio Dell's Eel River Trail project develops a 1/4-mile, shared-use path along the river in an underserved community in Humboldt County by providing the first designated public access to Eel River in the city. 
  • County of Lake's Beautification Initiative project provides upgrades to county parks including restrooms, public art, shade structures, and benches. In addition, educational campaigns to maintain county parks as a means of health and wellness in an underserved area. 
  • Hoopa Valley Tribe Council's Hoopa Four Project focuses on debris removal, beautification, rehabilitation, and enhancement to community parks for ADA accessibility and community recreation. The project supports community pride and well-being in a historically underserved community in Humboldt County.
  • Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation, and Conservation District's Peninsula Beautification Project enhances public spaces and increases the number of locations residents can safely enjoy in a community the struggles with illegal dumping and other illicit activities that create a sense of discomfort for residents. The project will increase access points to beaches and local trails for safe recreational opportunities. 
  • The Manchester Band of Pomo Indians' Tribal Clean-up project focuses on beautifying tribal lands through waste removal and vegetation rehabilitation in a historically underserved, low-income community in Mendocino County. The project includes removing abandoned vehicles and overgrown vegetation to provide a healthier environment for transit, walking, and recreation. 

These local projects are in addition to the $312 million for 126 beautification projects along the state highway system. 

District 1 Events

Annual Litter Clean Up Day
Thursday, May 26

Smith River Large Item Dump Day
Saturday, May 21 10AM - 2 PM (or until capacity is reached)
Xaa-wan'-k'wvt Village & Resort
12420 US Hwy 101, Smith River
Enter from Lopez Street
Smith River Dump Day Poster

 

Orick Dump Day
Saturday, April 30 9 AM - 1 PM (or until capacity is reached)
Old Mill Site on Bald Hills Road off Hwy 101

Statewide Dump Day Events

Saturday, April 23, 10 AM - 2 PM (or until capacity is reached)
Ukiah Railroad Depot Lot - Tires Only
Lakeport C&S Waste Transfer Station - Tires, Mattresses, and Furniture
Clearlake SLRR Recycling Center - Tires, Mattresses, and Furniture

Vance Parklet Groundbreaking
Thursday, April 14, 10 AM
Intersection of State Route 255 and Vance Avenue in Manila.
Celebrate the first Clean California State Beautification Project to break ground in the state!

Gasquet Dump Day
Sunday, March 20, 10 AM - 2 PM (or until capacity reached)
Gasquet Transfer Station
Off Old Gasquet Toll Road 
1/2 a mile east of Mountain Elementary School

Gasquet Dump Day Poster (PDF)

Klamath Dump Day
Sunday, February 27, 10 AM - 2 PM (or until capacity reached)
Klamath Transfer Station
Off Highway 101 at Klamath Beach Road

Klamath Dump Day Poster (PDF)

 

District 1 Frequently Asked Questions

Caltrans removed 267,000 cubic yards of trash in 2020 — enough to fill 18,000 garbage trucks. Clean California will remove an additional 1.2 million cubic yards, or 21,000 tons, of trash from the state system alone.

This much trash:

  • Fills 81,000 garbage trucks
  • Fills the Rose Bowl 3 times
  • Fills enough trash bags to cross 3,000 miles — the length of the U.S. from east to west
  • Weighs the equivalent of 135 Statues of Liberty

These figures are only for trash on the state highway system and does not include local litter collection. 

$418M: Litter Abatement over three years

$287M: State Beautification Projects over two years

$296M: Local Beautification Projects over two years

$33M: Public Education over two years

$62M: Project Design, Construction, Local Support and Engagement 

Caltrans estimates that Clean California will create an estimated 10,000-11,000 jobs over three years, including state jobs and opportunities for people experiencing homelessness, at-risk youth, and people re-entering society following incarceration.

Communities along state highways in all 58 California counties stand to benefit from Clean California. Caltrans will ramp up trash collection efforts and incorporate sustainable landscapes along state highways. Caltrans will fund projects on local streets and roads, tribal lands, parks, pathways and transit centers through a new grant program to clean and enhance public spaces.
Caltrans is currently developing the criteria to equitably award the local grants to underserved, rural and urban communities throughout the state. Communities with unique and significant projects that meet the program’s criteria will be eligible to receive funds based on need, population and the number of proposals. Caltrans will match local investments using a need-based formula that provides additional state support to underserved communities with a goal of funding more than 100 local projects throughout California a year.
This initiative focuses on driving a cultural shift of shared responsibility and community pride for the cleanliness of our roadways through education on properly throwing away trash and the impacts littering has on natural resources, waterways, public safety and health to encourage Californians to do their part to keep our state clean.
It won’t. The funding for Clean California is separate from the budget for the state’s highways and bridges. Senate Bill 1, the transportation bill signed into law in 2017, invests $5 billion dollars a year to repair and upgrade bridges, pavement, local roads and transit. Learn more at rebuildingca.ca.gov.

Clean California Logo

 

 

Key Action Areas

1. Engage & Invest In Communities

Create jobs and support local artists while cleaning and beautifying local roads through community grants.

2. Education

Drive a cultural shift of shared responsibility for the cleanliness of our roadways through litter prevention education campaigns that focus on properly throwing away trash and the impact littering has on natural resources, waterways, public safety and health.

3. Expand Litter Pick-Up

Significantly reduce trash from state highways and local roads by strengthening trash collection by Caltrans, community service programs and local volunteers. Increase access to waste facilities and provide free monthly disposal sites throughout the state.

4. Enhance Infrastructure

Implement sustainable beautification projects that improve safety and transform dividing highways into spaces that unify communities..