2024-2025 Sustainable Transportation Planning Grant Winners

2024-2025 Sustainable Grant Recipients (PDF)

FY 2024-25 Awards

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

1

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of Del Norte

Climate Adaptation Planning for Transportation Drainage Infrastructure

Del Norte County

NA

(unincorporated Del Norte County)

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The project is specific to drainage infrastructure associated with the County maintained road system. Data will be collected and a countywide geographic information system (GIS) documenting existing drainage infrastructure features associated with the County maintained road system will be developed, existing conditions will be evaluated relative to anticipated impacts from climate change through a hydrology and hydraulics analysis, and a capital improvement plan (CIP) for drainage infrastructure associated with the County maintained road system will be developed. Improvements included in the CIP may be designed up to 30% to inform future climate adaptation project development efforts and the Regional Transportation Plan.

Consistent with the Sustainable Transportation Planning Grant Program the project will prioritize public engagement, climate adaptation planning within the planning horizon (2050 and beyond), and the grant program objectives.

Engagement will include substantial outreach to individuals, non-profits, tribal governments, and local, state, and federal agencies with one of the primary goals being collaborative regionally appropriate planning outcomes.

$2,655,900

1

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG)

Humboldt Partnering Assets & Authorities for Comprehensive Transit (PAACT)

Humboldt

(countywide region)

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

Humboldt’s transit service is impressive for such a rural, remote, low-density region, but there are persistent unmet needs for more span and frequency which cannot be met without more housing and mixed uses developed in in-fill areas. The project will build strong government-to-government partnerships, harnessing interagency leadership to reshape the region’s transit system into a more connected, efficient, and more user-focused multi-modal network that attracts significantly more users in upcoming years. A transit network analysis will complement the short-term Transit Development Plan (Dec. 2023) by identifying long-term opportunities to coordinate or consolidate routes, services, and/or governance, and leverage additional funding sources to expand transit service and multimodal options.

The project will focus on building strong working relationships among HCAOG, Humboldt Transit Authority (HTA), other transit and mobility-service providers, Caltrans, local tribes, cities, and county agencies in order to plan transportation and land use together, taking into account socio-economic and equity factors and funding mechanisms. The efforts from this study will serve as a guide for agencies with land-use authority to increase consideration, and coordination, of multi-modal access in land use goals, policy, codes, and discretionary permitting.

$479,500

1

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Lake County/City Area Planning Council

Lake County Zero Emission Vehicle Infrastructure Plan

Lake County

City of Clearlake and City of Lakeport

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The Project aims to develop a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) charging/fueling infrastructure plan. This project allows Lake County to join a larger energy network with neighboring jurisdictions that have already developed an electric vehicle charging network with future expansion, while Lake County’s budget constraints have limited such progress. Aligned with the State’s 2021 Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure, the project emphasizes investment in ZEV infrastructure, especially in rural areas. It involves collaboration with local Lake County agencies, including planning and public works, as well as tribal governments, to assess ZEV infrastructure needs and integrate these into land use and planning tools. The project is further supported by the 2022 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) for the Lake County region, which include policies and objectives that support the purpose of this project, including support for planning projects that further greenhouse gas reducing efforts and plans that facilitate a transition to ZEV consistent with executive order N-79-20.

$177,060

1

Climate Adaptation Planning

Mendocino Council of Governments

Mendocino County Sea Level Rise Roadway Impact Study

Mendocino

Fort Bragg, Point Arena

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

This project will develop a feasibility study (informed by in-depth data collection, mapping, & analysis) to identify, analyze, and propose modifications to at-risk Mendocino County coastal roads vulnerable to sea level encroachments. Study is needed to identify the facilities at risk of failure due to impacts of Sea-Level Rise & climate change. Major deliverables include: consultant procurement process; coordination meetings with partners; literature review; public outreach; preliminary reports/cost estimates; alternative analysis report, draft/final reports. Desired outcome is a final report that includes locations for the at-risk roads, existing conditions, prioritization, and feasible alternatives for modifications. Parties involved include: Mendocino Council of Governments, Caltrans District 1, Mendocino Co. Dept. of Transportation, City of Fort Bragg, City of Point Arena, Gualala and Westport Municipal Advisory Councils, tribes, community-based organizations, public safety officials, community members, and elected officials. Project is aligned with 2022 RTP (Objective CCE 4: Improve resiliency of the region’s transportation system to climate-related impacts) and CAPTI Strategy S5 re: Climate Resilience & Transportation Improvements.

$354,120

2

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Modoc County Road Department

Modoc County Active and Multimodal Transportation Plan

Modoc

Various

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

To address the challenges to active transportation — including an almost complete lack of infrastructure to support walking, bicycling, and access to transit — identified in the 2020 Modoc Local Road Safety Plan (LRSP), Modoc County will develop an Active and Multimodal Transportation Plan that will include a prioritized list of active transportation (AT) and transit projects in communities throughout the county. The plan will identify changes that can be made to streets, sidewalks, crossings, trails, and transit service to improve access for pedestrians and cyclists to schools, retail and other key destinations in the City of Alturas and the unincorporated communities. It will also explore options for trail connections between communities and to recreation areas and, will include complementary policy recommendations, funding mechanisms, and a detailed strategy to ensure implementation of projects.

The county will partner with the nonprofit CivicWell to conduct an intensive, participatory planning process, and recommendations will be informed through robust community engagement activities with stakeholders and residents that include but are not limited to Caltrans, county transportation and housing staff, schools and school districts, tribal governments, chambers of commerce, senior centers, and community-based organizations. The plan is necessary to implement the recommendations in the LRSP and the Regional Transportation Plan which support the state’s efforts to reduce vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas emissions and improve safety for all modes of travel.

$251,223

2

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Plumas County Transportation Commission

Plumas County Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Master Plan

Plumas County

Chester, Graeagle, Greenville, Portola, & Quincy

Rural Communities

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Infrastructure Master Plan for Plumas County is a visionary project aimed at constructing EV charging facilities throughout the county. Its necessity stems from the current lack of adequate public EV charging options, hindering the adoption of environmentally friendly vehicles. The plan involves a thorough assessment of the existing charging landscape and the identification of strategic locations for new charging stations. This will enhance the county's commitment to ecological preservation, boost economic growth, and improve local and tourist mobility. In collaboration with key stakeholders and aligned with regional sustainability goals, this initiative marks a significant step towards a sustainable and well-connected community, driving Plumas County towards an eco-friendly future.

$168,207

2

Climate Adaptation Planning

Siskiyou County Local Transportation Commission

Siskiyou County Evacuation and Preparedness Plan

County of Siskiyou

County of Siskiyou, Cities of Dorris, Dunsmuir, Etna, Fort Jones, Montague, Mt Shasta, Tulelake, Weed, and Yreka, and Other Unincorporated Communities throughout the region.

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

Siskiyou County has experienced twenty-three wildfires dating back to 2020 that have resulted in 1,035,203 acres burned plus subsequent mud flows and mud slides impacting transportation facilities. Evacuation efforts during events have been a partnership between the Siskiyou County Office of Emergency Services (with other law enforcement agencies) and Siskiyou Transit and General Express (STAGE), providing transportation services to transit dependent residents and other evacuees who lost transportation resources. This project would establish evacuation protocols and procedures for relevant agencies, in conjunction with existing emergency operations. The final product would include a reference document aimed at seamless coordination between the various agencies and communities with respect to transportation and evacuation services. The project will also be used to analyze the risk assessments of existing transportation facilities to determine potential strategies or improvement needs for vulnerable areas and populations.

$250,136

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

3

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Elk Grove

Heat Resilient Transportation System Implementation Plan

Sacramento

Elk Grove

Regional/Local Definition

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The City of Elk Grove is working to adapt to the effects of climate change and address urban heat island (UHI) with the development of a Heat Resilient Transportation System Implementation Plan. Extreme heat is already being felt as a major impact of climate change for the city, with the number and severity of extreme heat events expected to worsen over the coming decades, affecting the City’s transportation system (with decreases in functionality and increases in failures), vulnerable populations, and community functions. The Heat Resilient Transportation System Implementation Plan will build off work completed by the City in the Community Mobility Resilience Plan, approved in 2021, which identified vulnerabilities and strategies for the City to address extreme heat. In addition, it will align with work completed for the region in the Capital Region Urban Heat Island Mitigation Project, led by the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District and the Local Government Commission, and support efforts by the State detailed in Protecting Californians From Extreme Heat: A State Action Plan to Build Community Resilience.

This project will identify specific actions related to cool pavement technologies, increased shading needs, and other options for addressing UHI along the roadways, sidewalks, trails, transit stops, and parking lots in Elk Grove. It will also identify needed updates to City ordinances, policies, guidelines, and design standards to address UHI contributions from the transportation system.

$441,000

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Folsom

Sustainable Transit Connections to Health Services Planning and Feasibility Study

Sacramento

City of Folsom

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The proposed Sustainable Transit Connections to Health Services Planning and Feasibility Study, in partnership with the Sacramento Regional Transit District (SacRT) and multiple stakeholders (including local medical facility partners), aims to proactively plan for sustainable transit connections that will support the planned future and rapid growth of the City of Folsom, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, relieve existing traffic congestion on Highway 50 and local roads, and provide an alternative regional transportation mode, improving access to jobs, services, and new healthcare facilities.

The project aims to develop a service and funding plan and would include route design, ridership forecasts, station area planning, public engagement, and negotiation of a unique multi-party sponsorship agreement, providing operating and capital funds for the new service.

The project will align with several current planning efforts, including, but not limited to the Folsom Light Rail Modernization Double Track Project, SACOG’s Green Means Go Green House Reduction Program, and the City’s General Plan and Folsom Plan Areas Specific Increased Residential Capacity Project by developing a new transit route that would serve the fastest growing area of the city (Folsom Plan Area) which is currently unserved by fixed-route transit.

The project is necessary in order to capitalizes on a unique convergence of developments in our region; including the imminent enhancements to the Regional Transit’s Gold Line, the early development stages of four new regional medical facilities (UC Davis, Dignity Health, Kaiser Permanente, and Sutter Health), and the growth of the Folsom Plan Area south of Highway 50.

$218,472

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Sacramento

Fruitridge Road Safety and Mobility Plan

Sacramento

Sacramento

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Safety (Vision Zero)

The City of Sacramento is proposing the Fruitridge Road Safety and Mobility Plan (the Plan), a safety and mobility plan on Fruitridge Road/Seamas Avenue from I-5 to Stockton Boulevard to improve active transportation, transit access and operations, and multimodal safety and accessibility. Fruitridge Road is a major east-west connector across the City and County of Sacramento, and this Plan will work to improve connectivity to several local and regional funded efforts including the Del Rio Trail Project and the Sacramento Regional Trail Network (construction expected to be complete in Spring 2024), the Franklin Complete Streets Project (construction targeted to begin in 2024), and the Fruitridge Road Improvements Project to improve local and regional connectivity and access daily destinations.

The major deliverables include conducting an existing conditions analysis, alternatives analysis, and meaningful and equitable community engagement to create a safety and mobility plan to increase regional active transportation, mobility, connectivity, transit, and safety. The project team will engage community leaders, neighborhood associations, community-based organizations, residents, businesses, visitors, the City of Sacramento Community Development and Public Works Departments, Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG), Caltrans, and Sacramento Regional Transit (SacRT) to understand the needs, experiences, and identify mobility solutions for people using the corridor.

This project aligns with local, regional, and State planning efforts including the City of Sacramento’s Bicycle Master Plan, Climate Action and Adaptation Plan, Transportation Priorities Plan, and Vision Zero Action Plan; SACOG’s Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy and Green Means Go; and Caltrans District 3 Active Transportation Plan.

$381,100

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Sacramento

Arden Way and Auburn Boulevard Vision Zero and Mobility Plan

Sacramento

City of Sacramento

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Safety (Vision Zero)

The City of Sacramento proposes the Arden Way and Auburn Boulevard Vision Zero and Mobility Plan, a safety and mobility plan for Arden Way from Del Paso Boulevard to Ethan Way, as well as Auburn Boulevard and Harvard Street from Marconi Circle to Arden Way. Both Arden Way and Auburn Boulevard are part of the City’s High Injury Network, with Arden Way identified as one of the top 10 corridors with the highest number of fatal and severe-injury crashes. Major deliverables include an analysis of existing conditions and meaningful and equitable community engagement resulting in a community-driven vision to transform the Arden Way and Auburn Boulevard corridors, designed to improve safety, increase active transportation and transit use, support housing infill, and support the struggling commercial businesses on the corridors. The project team will engage community leaders and organizations, residents, businesses, visitors, various City of Sacramento agencies, Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG), Caltrans, Sacramento Regional Transit (SacRT), and others to understand the needs and experiences using these corridors.

This plan directly aligns with Caltrans’ commitment to safety as a top priority identified in the Caltrans Strategic Plan, as well as local, regional, and State planning efforts including the City’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plans, Climate Action and Adaptation Plan (CAAP), Transportation Priorities Plan (TPP), and Vision Zero Action Plan; Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (MTP/SCS) and Green Means Go program; and Caltrans District 3 Active Transportation Plan.

$399,120

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of South Lake Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe Mulitmodal Mainstreet Corridor Plan

El Dorado County

City of South Lake Tahoe, US Highway 50 and

State Route 89

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016)

Complete Streets (Multimodal Specific Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The City of South Lake Tahoe will prepare a Multimodal Mainstreet Corridor Plan along US Highway 50 and State Route 89, which are the main facilities for access and circulation throughout the City and the wider Lake Tahoe Basin/State line region. The project will identify, analyze, and propose enhancements to these transportation corridors that will improve safety and access for walking and bicycling, facilitate modal shifts away from vehicles through a more efficient transit system, and provide solutions that improve the quality of life for community members and regional visitors alike. The Plan will have a wide scope with consideration for all road users and will identify priority areas for multimodal and sustainable transportation improvements, recommend specific projects and strategies to address the existing issues, and provide the foundation for future implementation grants. The project will involve a robust public engagement/outreach strategy through workshops, pop-up events, and surveys and will also include coordination with Caltrans District 3, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA), and El Dorado County to foster collaboration with existing regional planning efforts. The eventual implementation of the design concepts identified within the study will align with State, regional, and local efforts to reduce vehicle miles traveled, address climate change goals, and create connections between South Lake Tahoe and its neighboring communities.

$420,512

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of West Sacramento

Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Trails Master Plan Update

Yolo

West Sacramento

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian)

The Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Trails Master Plan (BPTMP) Update will bring the City’s active transportation plans up to date by using better community engagement methods, incorporating completed work, and adding new projects to improve the network.

The 2018 BPTMP included four “signature projects” with conceptual designs and an affirmative statement that they are the City’s priority, and the City has completed one and begun construction on the remaining three. The City will use the BPTMP Update to identify further ambitious goals for signature projects. These will probably include the following projects the City knows to be community priorities from our ongoing engagement:

•A trail crossing of the Port of West Sacramento’s Barge Canal

•A trail crossing of railroad embankments that isolate the Bryte-Broderick area

The Update is essential because the City has been denied federal funding due to USDOT determining that the current BPTMP is outdated.

The City of West Sacramento has received California HCD’s Pro-Housing Designation.

$309,855

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of West Sacramento

Vehicle Miles Traveled Reduction and Mitigation Fee Program

Yolo County

West Sacramento

At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

Senate Bill 743 (SB 743) replaced vehicle delay with Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) as a finding of significance under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and the City desires to establish a VMT mitigation fee to support mobility improvements that would be more effective in reducing VMT and to streamline CEQA clearance. This project analyze best-practices (e.g. statutory requirements, legal requirements, and pending legal cases) for VMT mitigation strategies; develop criteria to determine developments and transportation projects subject to the VMT Reduction Program; establish VMT metrics and thresholds for the Traffic Impact Fee and Traffic Impact Analysis Guidelines; identify projects and programs to be funded by the VMT Mitigation Fee; and recommend a VMT mitigation fee structure (may require nexus analysis and/or calculation and establishment of a fee) through a program that considers local needs, goals, and equity. The City will coordinate with internal departments on the critical and necessary updates the 2005 Traffic Impact Fee and 2006 Traffic Impact Analysis Guidelines for compliance with SB 743. The City will also work with technical stakeholders (i.e. Caltrans, Sacramento Area Council of Governments, Yolo County Transportation District, Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, and Yolo County) and conduct outreach to prepare an equity-based program. A VMT Reduction and Mitigation Program is consistent with policies in the City's Mobility Element (adopted January 2024), and can provide a funding source and/or support the implementation of projects/programs identified the City's Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Trails Master Plan; West Sacramento Mobility Action Plan; the SACOG Metropolitan Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy; and state related efforts to invest in active transportation, climate change reduction, and underserved communities.

$354,120

3

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of Sacramento

Rancho Murieta Resilience Plan

Sacramento

Rancho Murieta

Regional/Local Definition

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The Rancho Murieta Resilience Plan is a data-driven approach to making a more resilient Rancho Murieta. Recent wildfires and flooding in areas surrounding Rancho Murieta revealed improvements needed in the transportation system that would improve community safety. SacDOT must make informed decisions on infrastructure needs to better facilitate evacuation and emergency response during future wildfire and flooding events. To that end, Sacramento County will engage important stakeholders in developing the Rancho Murieta Resilience Plan, likely including the established Rancho Murieta Fire Safe Council, various County agencies, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), the Miwok Native American tribe, and more.

$354,120

3

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of Sutter

Climate Change Vulnerability Analysis for Live Oak and Gilsizer Drainage Districts

Sutter County

NA - Rural Sutter County

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

Sutter County is experiencing localized flooding and infrastructure failures in many areas due to climate change and inadequate culvert capacities, which disrupts transportation, damages infrastructure, and creates a safety issue. This project will conduct a vulnerability analysis of the Gilsizer and Live Oak drainage districts, including the existing culverts running under County-owned and maintained roadways for impacts due to climate change. The analysis will evaluate the existing culverts, including both hydraulic capacity and structural integrity. The analysis will then evaluate the existing systems’ ability to convey the anticipated flows predicted using the State’s latest climate prediction models.

The County will utilize the findings of this analysis to prioritize system improvements to accommodate the impacts of climate change.

$314,500

3

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of Yuba

Climate Change Vulnerability Analysis for Rural Road Culverts

Yuba County

NA - Rural Yuba County

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Safety (Vision Zero)

Yuba County is beginning to experience localized flooding in many rural areas due to inadequate culvert capacities, which disrupts transportation and creates a safety issue. This project will conduct a vulnerability analysis of the estimated 4,000 existing culverts running under County owned and maintained rural roadways for impacts due to climate change. The analysis will inventory the existing culverts, including location, diameter, pipe material, length, condition, and depth below the roadway. The analysis will then evaluate the existing culverts’ ability to convey the anticipated flows predicted using the State’s latest climate prediction models. The County will utilize the findings of this analysis to prioritize replacement of culverts that cannot accommodate the impacts of climate change.

$901,800

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Glenn County Transportation Commission (GCTC)

Short-Range Transit Plan

Glenn County

Artois, CA | Hamilton City, CA

| Willows, CA | Hamilton City, CA

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

Formulate a comprehensive updated Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to analyze our current transit services and establish future goals spanning the next decade. The SRTP will conduct a thorough examination of our agency’s capital and operating expenses, assess future fleet requirements, and provide appropriate recommendations for potential adjustments to transit services. Furthermore, the SRTP will function as a substantiation tool for our agency's pursuit of state or federal grants. Collaboration with key project partners, such as the Glenn County Transportation Commission (GCTC) and a consultant, will be initiated at the project's kickoff to ensure a well-rounded approach.

$130,537

3

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

Nevada County Transportation Commission

Reenvisioning Transit in Western Nevada County/Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA)

Nevada

City of Grass Valley, City of Nevada City, North San Juan, Lake of the Pines

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The Reenvisioning Transit in Western Nevada County / Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) will comprehensively review the existing transit services offered and identify areas opportunities to transition to alternative operating models to provide greater system efficiency and ridership benefits. Similar to many other transit systems across the nation, Nevada County Connects (fixed route transit service) has not rebounded from the impacts of the COVID 19 Pandemic and it is imperative to identify the most cost effective and efficient services with the limited operational funding streams available to meet the needs of the residents and visitors of Western Nevada County.

NCTC will manage this study in coordination with Nevada County Connects, the Cities of Nevada City and Grass Valley, key stakeholders, and residents to capture the vision that that most successfully explores the relationships between effective transit and land-use, population growth and employment patterns, as well as social equity and areas of high transit need. The COA will generate recommendations based on extensive data analysis, public outreach, and industry best practices for deploying various public transportation modes and integrating with the Statewide Transit and Rail Plans, and the COA shall consider an entire spectrum of service options ranging from minor modifications to a full “reset” of the system. These options may include traditional fixed route service, dial-a-ride service, micro-transit service, micro-mobility options, and/or a combination to provide address the challenges of meeting the transit needs outside the fixed route/ADA service areas and outlying communities.

$170,000

3

Climate Adaptation Planning

Placer County Transportation Planning Agency

Placer County Evacuation & Transportation Resiliency Plan

Placer County

Auburn, Colfax, Lincoln, Loomis, Rocklin, Roseville, Unincorporated Placer County

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

To address Placer County’s growing climate vulnerability, the Placer County Evacuation & Transportation Resiliency Plan (ETRP) will analyze the county’s multimodal transportation system and assess constraints hindering evacuation under a range of extreme events, including areas within high fire severity zones, state responsibility areas, and other areas prone to disasters such as extreme heat/poor air quality, heavy precipitation/flooding/landslides, extreme snow events, and public safety power shutoffs. This planning effort will improve our understanding of capacity, safety, and viability issues under a range of emergency scenarios. This plan will also help Placer County meet the requirements of AB 747 and AB 1409 by identifying evacuation locations and potential sites for Community Resilience Hubs.

$630,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Sacramento Regional Transit District

Sacramento Countywide Safe Routes to Transit

Sacramento

Sacramento

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Safety (Vision Zero)

In the face of increased demand for bicycle and pedestrian mobility, the Sacramento area currently lacks a countywide safe route to transit plan, resulting in existing gaps that create disjointed and less-safe access to transit. SacRT, in partnership with Civic Thread and Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates (SABA) will conduct a comprehensive review of active transportation plans, including SacRT’s Bus Stop Improvement Plan (BSIP), to analyze conditions, prioritize locations, and formulate recommendations for safe routes to transit options. Through community engagement, the planning effort aims to transform a car-centric environment into a safer and more comfortable atmosphere for cyclists and pedestrians to connect with transit services, ensuring equitable transportation by mitigating obstacles encountered by transit riders of all ages and abilities. The final plan will support SacRT in future funding endeavors and other agency development projects requiring VMT mitigation and affordable housing financing strategies.

$442,650

3

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Sacramento Regional Transit District

Reimagining Roseville Road Light Rail Staton for Equitable Access

Sacramento

Sacramento

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Safety (Vision Zero) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The Reimagining Roseville Road Light Rail Station for Equitable Access Project focuses on reopening and enhancing access to the Roseville Road Light Rail Station via the Grand Ave bridge, which has been closed due to a recent fire and other illegal activities. Acknowledging the safety and maintenance challenges posed by the bridge, the project aims to redefine it as a community asset rather than a liability and intends to develop a plan to actualize this vision.

This planning effort involves community engagement to identify safety and access improvements, such as lighting upgrades, cameras, channelizers, bike/ped facilities, urban greening elements, artwork, and signage, fostering a safer and more accessible environment for the community north of the station and creating a genuine neighborhood amenity.

$177,060

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Alameda County Transportation Commission

I-580/I-238/I-880 Safe

Access and Community Resilience Plan

Alameda County

Hayward, San Leandro, Unincorporated Alameda County

Regional/Local Definition

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Safety (Vision Zero)

The I-580/I-238/I-880 Safe Access and Community Resilience Plan will identify safety, access, and climate-adaptive improvements to support community resilience in communities adjacent to and disproportionately burdened by three heavily traveled interstates: I-880, I-238, and I-580. Building upon findings in the Caltrans District 4 Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, the I-580 Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan, and BART’s assessment of gaps in multimodal access to stations, this plan will assess the barriers that major transportation infrastructure poses in this area and will develop recommendations that increase coverage of connected and safe, multimodal access to transit and planned development, encouraging mode-shift and more equitable outcomes for marginalized communities. The planning process will include a focused safety and access needs assessment, extensive stakeholder and community engagement to inform needs, priorities, and co-creation of recommendations that will include climate and community resilience elements such as greening and placemaking, leading to multi-benefit, community-enhancing recommendations. With an eye to implementation, the grant project will take recommendations further than in previous plans and develop concept designs, cost estimates and detailed funding plans for community-identified high-priority solutions. Alameda CTC will lead this collaborative effort with Caltrans, local jurisdictions (San Leandro, Hayward, Alameda County), Community-based Organizations, transit agencies (AC Transit, BART, Capitol Corridor), as well as special districts such as the Alameda County Flood Control District and the Hayward Area Recreational District.

$564,000

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority

Alviso Railroad Adaptation Planning Study

Alameda, Santa Clara

Fremont, San Jose

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority (CCJPA) is proposing to continue critical climate adaptation planning efforts for railroad infrastructure in the Alviso wetland area of the San Francisco Bay with the next phase of pre-environmental planning work necessary to determine engineering feasibility of various adaptation alternatives and to conduct additional stakeholder outreach for adaptation solutions that benefit transit, the natural environment, and nearby communities. Adaptation of railroad infrastructure in this area will achieve multiple goals: increase rail infrastructure resilience, improve rail transportation capacity and redundancy, enhance natural habitat restoration, and provide additional flood protection for surrounding communities.

$831,534

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of Alameda

Oakland-Alameda Estuary Waterway Study

Alameda

Alameda, Oakland

Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The Oakland-Alameda Estuary Waterway Study is a critical 16-month technical study of how vessels use the Oakland- Alameda Estuary (Estuary), a navigable waterway that separates the cities of Alameda and Oakland, in support of advancing a new proposed bicycle and pedestrian moveable bridge (Bridge) connecting the two cities. This study is necessary to move forward the Bridge project, which is included in 15 local, countywide, regional and state planning documents, and will create a sustainable, equitable and comfortable transportation option between the two cities where none currently exists. The major deliverables of the Study include comprehensive data on the vessels using the Estuary, and desktop simulations of multiple potential bridge locations, which will allow the development of the height and width parameters for a potential bridge. The United States Coast Guard (USCG) and the commercial and recreational boating community will be key stakeholders. This study is a critical planning step and no feasible concepts or environmental analysis for the PAED phase can begin without the study results.

$480,070

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Brisbane

Brisbane Lagoon and

U.S. Highway 101 Adaptation Planning (USE THIS ONE)

San Mateo

Bribane

 

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Corridor (Local or Regional)

The City of Brisbane, nestled between the lower slopes of the San Bruno Mountain and the San Francisco Bayshore, is threatened by the impacts of climate change and sea level rise. Currently the Brisbane Lagoon, which was formed by the construction of the U.S. Highway 101, serves as a critical piece of flood control infrastructure. With a projected scenario of 6.6 feet of sea level rise within a 100-year floodplain, which is based on the modeling undertaken by the San Mateo County Flood and Sea Level Rise Resiliency District (OneShoreline), the U.S. Highway 101 will be inundated, and the Brisbane Lagoon will not have adequate flood control capacity to protect the highway and the surrounding wildlife and human habitats. The City of Brisbane will use the requested funding to complete a hydrological study to prepare project alternatives that address these critical vulnerabilities for the U.S. 101, addressing CTP 2050's climate resilience goals "by identifying infrastructure vulnerabilities and adapting our system to address them."

$259,920

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Campbell

Campbell Multimodal Transportation Plan

County of Santa Clara

City of Campbell

Regional/Local Definition

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The City of Campbell will prepare its very first citywide Multimodal Transportation Plan that will improve mobility for all ages, provide greater connectivity, improve safety and accessibility for walking and bicycling, support new TOD projects (with 6,500 new housing units planned by 2031), support mode shifts to reduce VMT and greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the quality of life for Campbell residents and the surrounding communities of Los Gatos, San Jose, and Saratoga.

While Campbell has three regional VTA light rail stations and three VTA bus routes, many residents face the first/last mile connection issue, making public transportation a less viable and attractive option. Campbell's current infrastructure gaps are evident in the absence of crosswalks and dedicated bike paths, leaving intersections unsafe for pedestrians and limiting cycling options.

The absence of a comprehensive transportation planning effort has led to disjointed investments without a strong overarching vision or accountability mechanism. Investing in a community-led multimodal plan to help advance the goals of the Campbell General Plan and the Campbell Climate Action and Adaptation Plan (currently underway), as well as align with the goals of Plan Bay Area 2050, California Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, and California Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI) will help further the safety, health, equity, environmental, and accessibility goals of each of these plans.

$496,000

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of Gilroy

Gilroy VMT/GHG Reduction Program

Santa Clara County

Gilroy

Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition) Other

The Gilroy VMT/GHG Reduction Program (“Program”) will include a City-wide Greenhouse Reduction / Climate Action Plan and a City-wide VMT Reduction / Transportation Demand Management Policy. The Program is necessary to ensure that VMT and GHG reduction measures are tailored to the unique needs of Gilroy, with an emphasis on mode shift, energy efficiency, and equity in Gilroy’s disadvantaged communities. The City of Gilroy will work closely with Community-Based Organizations (CBOs), developers, State and regional agencies, and other stakeholders to identify GHG/VMT-reducing measures that will have the greatest impact on advancing equity, while also meeting California’s mandate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. The project will include a review of existing tools and best practices at the County, regional and state level, and an implementation plan to identify key actions, roles, and timing of next steps. This Program can serve as a model for other suburban jurisdictions that have similar characteristics to Gilroy, will have cross-jurisdictional benefits by reducing VMT county-wide, and helps implement Senate Bill 743, Caltrans Strategic Plan, Plan Bay Area 2050, California Transportation Plan 2050, and City of Gilroy goals for sustainable development, environmental justice, and housing preservation outlined in the Gilroy 2040 General Plan and 2023-2031 Housing Element.

$335,529

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Mountain View

Rengstorff Avenue Complete Streets Study

Santa Clara County

City of Mountain View

Regional/Local Definition

Complete Streets (Multimodal Specific Type) Safety (Vision Zero)

The Rengstorff Avenue Complete Streets Study (Study) will consider ways to enhance safety, incorporate green street elements, and improve multimodal access for people walking, bicycling, using public transit, and driving the 1.7 mile corridor along and across Rengstorff Avenue between El Camino Real and Leghorn Street. The project is necessary because Rengstorff Avenue is on the City’s high injury network and MTC’s regional high injury network and was identified as the highest priority corridor in the City’s Comprehensive Modal Plan (“AccessMV”), based on equity, mobility, walkability/bikeability, safety, sustainability, and consistency criteria. Major deliverables will include parking and traffic analysis, community and stakeholder engagement, preliminary concept development and feasibility analysis, and plan line drawings for a preferred concept.

$352,000

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of San Jose

San José Travel Models Update with Big Data

Santa Clara

San Jose

Regional/Local Definition

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The City of San José Department of Transportation (San José DOT) proposes in partnership with UC Berkeley/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (UCB/LBNL) to update its Travel Forecasting Model (TFM) with post- pandemic data, including on-demand location-based geospatial transportation data (Big Data). San José's TFMs, which include a trip-based travel demand model and a vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) Evaluation Tool, are effective tools for the City of San José to measure travel patterns and transportation impacts for a given land use and transportation network scenario. Historically, San José DOT has updated its TFMs every four years to remain consistent with the latest adopted Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS). San José DOT last updated and recalibrated its transportation data and TFM in 2020 with pre-pandemic assumptions.

Big Data analytics in transportation models offer highly granular datasets that will enable San José DOT to calibrate and validate its TFMs to estimate and assess post-pandemic travel behaviors and transportation demand. Integrated with UCB/LBNL’s Mobiliti, San José DOT will have greater precision in its ability to identify how changes in city infrastructure will impact citywide traffic dynamics, and leverage that toward its transportation and climate goals.

Improving the City’s TFMs with Big Data will comprise five main deliverables: 1) an updated trip-based travel demand model with regional and post-pandemic data that is consistent with the latest adopted RTP/SCS, Plan Bay Area 2050;

2) a refinement, validation, and calibration of the trip distribution, mode choice, and trip assignment modules within the trip-based travel demand model; 3) an updated2040 General Plan horizon year to scenario; 4) an updated goal-based 2040 General Plan scenario and mode share goal analysis; and 5) an updated VMT Evaluation Tool.

$221,325

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of South San Francisco

South San Francisco Shoreline Protection and Connectivity Project

San Mateo County

San Bruno, South San Francisco

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type)

This feasibility study will explore conceptual solutions to simultaneously create a new multi-modal transportation connection, address coastal flooding exacerbated by sea level rise and increased storm surge along San Francisco Bay near the outfalls of Colma Creek and San Bruno Creek, and provide other co-benefits to the surrounding disadvantaged communities. This Study will work collaboratively with multiple jurisdictional agencies to examine how new dual-purpose linear infrastructure could connect the US-101/I-380 interchange with Oyster Point while providing coastal flood protection to residences, businesses, critical transportation infrastructure (US-101, Caltrain, and SamTrans), and other key regional infrastructure such as SFO and the SSF-SB Water Quality Control Plant. The study will involve interagency coordination with Caltrans, SamTrans, OneShoreline, San Bruno, Caltrain, and SFO, and extensive outreach to community and environmental stakeholder groups. The Study will develop and apply feasibility criteria to analyze viability of the proposed solutions relative to technical, financial, environmental, and community- acceptance considerations, then a community-driven design process will develop and analyze solutions culminating in a preferred alternative, all of which will be documented in a report with 10% conceptual design documents and order- of-magnitude cost estimates.

$883,087

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA)

Countywide Emergency Evacuation Plan

Contra Costa

Antioch, Brentwood, Clayton, Concord, Danville, El Cerrito, Hercules, Lafayette, Martinez, Moraga, Oakley, Orinda, Pinole, Pittsburg, Pleasant Hill, Richmond, San Pablo, San Ramon, Walnut Creek

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version

4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) proposes to develop a new Countywide Emergency Evacuation Plan (Plan). This Plan will conduct local-level evacuation compliance assessments (per Senate Bill 99) and a high-level evacuation route capacity, safety, and viability analysis (per Assembly Bill 747) for the county that includes the 19 cities/towns and unincorporated County. The Plan builds upon the development of the Contra Costa County multi- jurisdictional Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. An outcome of this study, as identified by several agencies throughout Contra Costa County, is an understanding that typical climate and other hazard risks may result in multi-jurisdictional evacuations using routes that may span several jurisdictions.

$1,490,000

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of San Mateo

San Mateo County Transportation Infrastructure Adaptation and Resilience Improvement Plan

San Mateo County

all cities of San Mateo County

Regional/Local Definition

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The proposed San Mateo County Transportation Infrastructure Adaptation and Resilience Improvement Plan (Project) will build on the efforts of past and current climate adaptation planning to advance transportation infrastructure adaptation needs and strategies. This Project will directly engage with County residents and businesses, including disadvantaged and low-income communities, and identify, prioritize, and plan infrastructure recommendations to improve access, safety and reliability on local roads and public transit assets within the project area. Extreme precipitation events, wildfires, and sea level rise are substantial threats in San Mateo County and are projected to continue to increase as a result of climate change. The increased probability of climate events requires planning and investments that can be prioritized and delivered to mitigate transportation impacts and enhance safety and accessibility. This process will be guided by the Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework, Complete Streets Strategies, Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI), Governor’s Office of Planning and Research Planning and Investing for a Resilient California: A Guidebook for State Agencies, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Adaptation Planning Guide, and other design and policy principles.

$515,000

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

County of Sonoma Climate Action and Resiliency Division

Equitable EV Charging Plan for Sonoma County

Sonoma County

County-wide

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The County of Sonoma, along with its sub-applicants and project partners, is requesting funding to develop the first- ever Equitable EV Charging Regional Plan for Sonoma County. The Plan will provide an equitable approach to forwarding electric vehicle adoption throughout the County, and will support a variety of State and regional efforts to achieve the State’s greenhouse gas reduction target of 85% by 2045.

The project is necessary because (a) there are many “charging deserts” throughout Sonoma County, limiting EV adoption and infrastructure support (b) there is no comprehensive plan for the County or its jurisdictions to strategically plan for siting EV charging infrastructure (c) there have been no extensive or documented studies of involving our Spanish-speaking, Latinx or disadvantaged communities into the EV adoption/infrastructure conversation.

The primary deliverable of the project is the Equitable EV Charging Regional Plan for Sonoma County, which will feature a prioritized list of strategic locations, a replicable equity analysis and a comprehensive plan poised for adoption, implementation and funding by the County and project partners.

Project partners include the County of Sonoma Climate Action & Resiliency Division as lead, sub-applicants Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA), Latino Service Providers (LSP) and the Stakeholder Advisory Group representing sectors as climate action and resiliency, transportation, energy, community development, housing, and business.

$247,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

4

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

Metropolitan Transportation Commission

One-Seat Ride Pilot Evaluation

Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Sonoma, Solano

This is a regionwide project and could potentially include any city within the nine-county Bay Area

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

This project will evaluate the ADA paratransit one-seat ride pilot program to determine the best methods of delivering a non-transfer, cross-jurisdictional ADA paratransit ride. MTC and the region's transit agencies have funded pilot programs to test various methods of non-transfer, cross-jurisdictional rides and this project seeks to evaluate each method to determine which models are most feasible for implementation.

This project will focus investments in providing a more seamless trip for disabled riders. The project partners for this work include MTC and all public transit providers in the counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.

This work is supported by recommendations in statewide plans (Caltrans Strategic Plan; California Transportation Plan 2050; and California Master Plan for Aging), as well as local plans and planning efforts (SF Bay Area's Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan; and the Transit Transformation Action Plan.

This project will provide vital information essential to MTC and transit operator decision-making in funding implementable projects that expand paratransit beyond the ADA and provide a more efficient and effective paratransit trip to riders with disabilities.

$350,000

4

Strategic Partnerships (FHWA SPR

Part I)

Metropolitan Transportation Commission

Southbound US101/I-280 Managed Lane Program Study

San Francisco

San Francisco

Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Corridor (Local or Regional) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The Southbound US101/I-280 Managed Lane Program Study would connect San Francisco with existing and planned projects in San Mateo County to provide continuous carpool or express lanes southbound from San Francisco to Santa Clara County. The study would also help close a critical gap in the regional managed lane network. The project would including working with partner agencies, neighboring jurisdictions, the region, and Caltrans to develop a managed lane program that uses pricing, express bus on freeway, transportation demand management, and affordability components with the goal of reducing congestion and increasing person throughput by efficiently prioritizing high occupancy vehicles.

$500,000

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

Port Department of the City of Oakland

Rising Seas and Oakland’s Infrastructure and Frontline Communities: Climate Adaptation Planning for Neighborhood-led Resiliency

Alameda

Oakland

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.)

The Port and City of Oakland’s Rising Seas and Oakland’s Infrastructure and Frontline Communities: Climate Adaptation Planning for Neighborhood-led Resiliency Project proposes to conduct a vulnerability assessment that focuses on modeling projected SLR and GWI levels for the Port and adjacent underserved communities. The vulnerability assessment will model future (2030, 2050, 2100) sea level rise, precipitation, storm surge, wave runup, tides, and areas of inundation. The GWI modeling will assess daily and seasonal fluctuations in the water table and analyze liquefaction potential. The Project will include the development and prioritization of strategies to mitigate tidal inundation and groundwater impact in an Adaptation Plan. At the inception and throughout the Project, the partnering entities will utilize an Advisory Committee and community stakeholder engagement (CSE) processes to guide and inform the Project.

$3,000,000

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive

San Francisco County Transportation Authority

Bayview Street Safety and Truck Relief Study

San Francisco

San Francisco

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.) Safety (Vision Zero)

The Bayview Neighborhood in San Francisco has multimodal corridors that serve as key freight routes. The Bayview is designated an Equity Priority Community by the MTC, and a disadvantaged, low income community by the CARB and the area has known safety challenges and air and noise impacts associated with freeway and freight traffic. The Study will collect and analyze new data sources while engaging a diverse group of stakeholders including community-based organizations, local agencies, and representatives of goods movement industry to recommend strategies that separate heavy truck traffic from sensitive land-uses and other road users, and improve freeway access, and general circulation through the study area. The study will ultimately recommend strategies for implementation to improve freight circulation and safety and advance the adoption of low- or zero-emission vehicles (LEV or ZEV), provide implementation guidance, develop cost estimates, and determine expected benefits. The research and findings will be a resource for other freight planning efforts in the city, region, and state and will advance the region’s Sustainable Communities Strategy and Plan Bay Area 2050 goals, as well as local priorities defined in the Streets and Freeways Strategy (see attachments) and ConnectSF, the city's long range planning effort.

$525,110

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

San Francisco Public Works

SOMA Under Freeway Park

San Francisco

San Francisco

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Safety (Vision Zero)

The SOMA Under Freeway Park will explore the potential of the underutilized right-of-way between 4th and 6th St. between Harrison and Bryant St. to rectify SOMA's (South of Market) flooding, unsafe pedestrian and bike routes, inequitable urban heat island and air pollution that significantly impacts this communities' health. The site area is in the Greening Priority Zone per San Francisco's Heating and Air Quality Resilience Study (Attachment A) which illustrates that SOMA suffers from the highest heat, air pollution, and lowest tree canopy culminating in high rates of hospitalization for asthma and diabetes which are known comorbidities with extreme heat which will only increase with climate change. The construction of the I-80 expressway divided the community, increased air pollution, and created unsafe street conditions for pedestrians and cyclists due to its street design, ramps, and crossings. The project will not only right environmental inequities and make all modes of transportation in SOMA more resilient, but also provide access to recreation, improve biodiversity, expand the urban tree canopy, and celebrate cultural expression for this under-served neighborhood in transition.

$626,000

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority

Guadalupe Adaptation and Resilience Plan

Santa Clara

San Jose

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version

4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The purpose of the Guadalupe Adaptation and Resilience Plan (Plan) is to conduct a climate vulnerability assessment and feasibility study of VTA’s Guadalupe Light Rail Division (Guadalupe Yard) located at 101 W Younger Avenue in San Jose, California. The Plan includes analysis of Guadalupe Yard’s vulnerability to climate change and a feasibility study to determine where and how on-site renewable energy generation, battery storage, and/or microgrids could be implemented to provide more reliable and grid-independent energy for the Guadalupe Yard and entire light rail system. Together, the climate vulnerability assessment and feasibility study will provide the basis for adapting Guadalupe Yard and improving light rail system resilience as climate conditions change over time. This will benefit the community by reducing service disruptions and improving the health and safety of VTA riders and workers exposed to flooding, extreme heat, and other hazards.

$474,468

4

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority

Across Barrier Connections Plan: Improving Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections Across Freeways

Santa Clara

Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill, Mountain View, Palo Alto, San Jose, Santa Clara, Saratoga, Sunnyvale

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version

4.0

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Other

The Across Barrier Connections Plan: Improving Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections Across Freeways (ABC Plan) will identify and prioritize locations in Santa Clara County where bicycle and pedestrian improvements along Caltrans’ limited access freeways can significantly benefit neighboring communities and encourage walking and bicycling. Most of Santa Clara County’s underserved communities are located within 1,000 feet of the freeway and experience more severe pedestrian and bicycle crashes, worse pollution, and greater connectivity barriers than other parts of the county. The ABC Plan will evaluate conditions within 1,000 feet of freeways; research and evaluate the historical impacts of freeway construction on communities; evaluate the current impact of freeways on community connectivity, health, and safety; evaluate current and future land use and destinations; and develop the plan to meet community needs and desires. VTA will invite the community to identify barriers and develop recommendations through broad outreach to the entire county and through focused outreach to specific priority areas with assistance from local community-based organizations, neighborhood associations, and other groups. Recommendations will include safe-systems approach countermeasures, freeway ramp modifications, new or improved pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure through interchanges or along overpasses/underpasses, new or improved pedestrian/bicycle bridges across freeways, and interchange redesigns.

$695,200

4

Climate Adaptation Planning

The City of San Mateo

Climate Adaptation Planning for Sea Level Rise and Stormwater Flooding

San Mateo

San Mateo

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type)

Critical transportation assets within the boundary of the City of San Mateo include assets maintained by Caltrain, Caltrans (State Route 92, US 101), SamTrans, and the City of San Mateo. These transportation assets comprise local roads, highways, bus routes, and rail, and are vulnerable to climate changeā€related effects such as, but not limited to, sea level rise and storms of increasing severity. In particular, coastal cities such as San Mateo face dual threats as storms of increasing severity lead to surface water flooding inland while sea level rise leads to inundation along the coast. Models based on the Ocean Protection Council's 2018 Updated California Sea Level Rise Guidance show that a 1 in 200 chance sea level rise projection for 2050, combined with a 1 in 5 chance storm, will lead to inundation impacting aforementioned transportation assets. The City of San Mateo is therefore seeking grant funding to support the following technical project activities: 1) preparing a climate adaptation plan specific to sea level rise and 2) updating its Stormwater Master Plan in an effort to plan for and implement projects to improve the aging stormwater infrastructure, which is seeing its capacity strained due to more frequent and higher intensity storms.

$554,500

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

5

Strategic Partnerships (FHWA SPR

Part I)

Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments

Regional Official Training and Certification Project

Monterey (Statewide)

Monterey (Statewide)

 

Other

The Regional Official Training and Certification Project seeks to strengthen the quality of decision-making on the state transportation system by building an on-demand training resource for the local elected officials who are appointed to serve on the “Regional Agency” boards. An oft overlooked aspect of state planning is that the achievement of federal planning factors and state objectives rely on the decion-making of 900 locally elected officials. The major deliverable of this project will be a set of informative, well-produced, and easy-to-watch training videos.

$128,000

5

Climate Adaptation Planning

Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments

Pajaro Bridge Infrastructure Resilient Design Study

County of Monterey (town of Pajaro), County of Santa Cruz

City of Watsonville

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Corridor (Local or Regional)

The Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments (AMBAG), in partnership with the Pajaro Regional Flood Management Agency (PRFMA), is seeking grant funding for the Pajaro Bridge Infrastructure Resilient Design Study (Pajaro BIRDS). This study, for the bridge located on Highway 1 at the Pajaro River in Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties, will increase the resilience of the Highway 1 at the Pajaro River from the impacts of flooding, drainage impoundment, sea level rise, and climate change. The improvements proposed in this study will help provide safe passage during an evacuation and reduce the risk of damage to the critical Highway 1 evacuation route. In addition, the proposed improvements would minimize impacts on natural resources & ecosystems by protecting 4,000 acres of prime agricultural land that contributes to the billion-dollar agricultural economy of the Pajaro Valley.

$2,250,200

5

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Monterey-Salinas Transit District

East Alisal Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and Salinas Transit Center (STC) Relocation Study

Monterey

Salinas

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Corridor (Local or Regional) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The proposed project is a planning study identifying a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) corridor in Salinas and potential locations for relocating the Salinas Transit Center (STC). The consultant prepared study will identify primary boarding locations and key sites for transit information technology to aid in the implementation of a BRT corridor with limited stops and frequent headways during peak hours. By relocating the STC along the proposed BRT, MST provides a safe and efficient way to connect disadvantaged neighborhoods to employment hubs around downtown. The project is consistent with regional planning documents (both the RTP and MTP), as well as the City of Salinas’ Downtown Vibrancy Plan and Alisal Vibrancy Plan. It also supports the grant program’s overarching objectives, as well as the State’s CTP 2050 to provide reliable and efficient mobility and accessibility.

$463,100

5

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

San Luis Obispo Council of Governments

Transportation Efficiency Analysis (TEA) 2.0

County of San Luis Obispo

City of Paso Robles, City of Atascadero, City of Morro Bay, City of San Luis Obispo, City of Pismo Beach, City of Arroyo Grande, City of Grover Beach

Regional/Local Definition

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition) Other

Our vision is that residents have access to a healthy housing supply with a diversity of housing types across all incomes near jobs and services. SLOCOG, the County of San Luis Obispo, and the seven incorporated Cities will collaboratively create the Transportation Efficiency Analysis (TEA) 2.0 by integrating economic, housing, and infrastructure data to identify how to better promote transportation access between affordable housing and job centers. TEA 2.0 includes a map application, a Return-on-Investment Study, and a foundational analysis for the 2027 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy and 2027 Regional Housing Needs Allocation. TEA 2.0 will help us achieve our local and State GHG emission reduction goals, will better promote transportation access between affordable housing and job centers, and will allow us to be strategic with our limited investment dollars.

$309,855

5

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

Santa Barbara County Association of Governments

Santa Barbara County AI Bike Mapping and Wayfinding Project

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

 

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Safety (Vision Zero)

Bicycle infrastructure is changing rapidly in Santa Barbara County with no updated map to communicate safe, connected routes to the public. The Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG), The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Simon Fraser University (SFU) will partner to train Artificial Intelligence (AI) to map bicycle infrastructure comfort classes, creating a consistently classified and updated resource. Using OpenStreetMap.org and Google Street View data, UCSB and SFU will generate a labeled training and testing dataset for the AI to use. SBCAG will hire and manage consultants to clean up the output into a cartographic map for small batch printing, and to prepare a universal, future-proof, regional wayfinding plan that will adapt to AI findings. The adoption of AI is scalable, allowing communities throughout California to apply a similar, holistic approach to planning and user adoption, resulting in improved safety, mobility, and access, as well as reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through mode-shift from automobiles to bicycling, while creating a deliverable for Complete Streets and Vision Zero efforts.

$480,000

5

Climate Adaptation Planning

Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission

Planning for Climate Resilience of the Zero Emission Passenger Rail and Trail Corridor

Santa Cruz County

Capitola, Unincorporated Santa Cruz County, Watsonville

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The RTC owned Santa Cruz Branch Rail Line (SCBRL) is a 32- mile continuous transportation corridor that traverses the most densely populated areas in Santa Cruz County and provides a direct connection between the communities located in north and south county. The RTC is currently developing concepts for a Zero Emission Passenger Rail and Trail Project (ZEPRT) along the SCBRL to maximize the transportation benefits of this corridor and to transform how people travel in Santa Cruz County. ZEPRT could include 22 miles of high-capacity passenger rail service between the City of Santa Cruz to the Coast Line at Pajaro Junction and 13 miles of a parallel bicycle and pedestrian path from Rio Del Mar Blvd in Aptos to Pajaro in northern Monterey County to complete a continuous 32 mile “Coastal Rail Trail” adjacent to the rail facility. However, the SCBRL corridor is vulnerable to climate change impacts as evidenced by recent weather events and projected future conditions. The planning project proposed here (“Project”) will develop short-, medium-, and long-term climate-resilient concepts for potential ZEPRT at the four locations most vulnerable to climate hazards - Capitola bluffs, La Selva/Manresa bluffs, Harkins Slough Rail Crossing, and Pajaro River Rail Bridge (Figure 1). Design concepts will consider the impacts of sea level rise, flooding, bluff retreat, and coastal erosion.

$1,369,780

5

Climate Adaptation Planning

Transportation Agency for Monterey County

HIGHWAY 1 ELKHORN SLOUGH CORRIDOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PROJECT

Monterey County

Moss Landing

Rural Communities

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The Transportation Agency for Monterey County (TAMC), working collaboratively with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve (ESNERR), proposes a project to evaluate the climate vulnerability of a key transportation corridor, Highway 1 in north Monterey County, and develop multimodal and nature- based transportation solutions to address this vulnerability. This project, the Highway 1 Elkhorn Slough Climate Resiliency Project, will focus on an eight-mile stretch of Highway 1 through the disadvantaged community of Moss Landing and the parallel rail tracks traversing the Elkhorn Slough. The corridor is vulnerable to coastal climate change impacts like sea level rise and storm surge, as evidenced in the 2021 Caltrans District 5 Adaptation Priorities report and the 2020 Central Coast Highway 1 Climate Resiliency Study, led by the Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments (AMBAG). The Highway 1 Elkhorn Slough Resiliency Project is in the planning phase. The funding requested in this grant, $2,250,000, will be used to prepare a Planning and Environmental Linkages (PEL) study and project initiation documentation utilizing and expanding upon existing feasibility studies that have analyzed nature- based and multimodal solutions to climate change impacts on the corridor.

$2,250,000

6

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Avenal

Climate Action & Adaptation Plan

Kings County

City of Avenal

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The City of Avenal's Climate Action and Adaptation Plan will benefit an economically disadvantaged farming community by assessing the climate vulnerabilities in our transportation infrastructure. Avenal urgently needs this project due to our firsthand experience with climate stressors, such as extreme heat, which significantly diminishes our quality of life and limits the viability of alternative transportation options. Key outcomes from this Project include developing specific adaptation strategies for priority corridors and our active transportation facilities, developing sustainable infrastructure design standards for our city, and performing meaningful and interactive engagement with our underserved residents, including those with disabilities, older adults, and low income residents, to arrive at solutions and recommendations that are equitable and appropriate for our unique community. This Project aligns with local, regional, and state efforts by finding local-level solutions to help our city transition away from transportation options that are carbon-intensive and into multimodal zero-emission transportation options that further California's GHG emission reduction goals and strengthen our community’s resilience against the effects of climate change.

$309,855

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Clovis

Clovis Transit Strategic Operations Plan

Fresno County

Clovis and Fresno

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

Public transit has evolved drastically over the last five years due to COVID pandemic impacts, new regulations such as California Air Resource Board's (CARB) - Innovative Clean Transit (ICT), new technologies, local policy changes, new federal and state funding opportunities, and requirements. Therefore, a strategic operations plan is necessary to reposition and realign the trajectory of the City's transit division. The Clovis Transit Strategic Operations Plan will assist the City in providing the vision, direction, and pathway to meet the identified strategic goals and objectives, provide performance measures, and guide the transit division to the next generation of a multimodal transportation system which focuses on accessibility, safety, social equity, innovation, housing, land use and preservation, air quality, health, and sustainability. The participation of stakeholders encompassing state agencies such as Caltrans, regional agencies including Fresno Council of Governments (FCOG), neighboring transit agencies, community organizations, educational institutions, residents, disadvantaged communities, and city staff will have an integral role in the development of the Clovis Transit Strategic Operations Plan. The final, council approved, strategic operations plan will be a living document and will integrate federal, state, Fresno COG Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy, as well as long- and short-range plans, the City's General Plan and Active Transportation Plan (ATP).

$152,714

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Fresno

City of Fresno Mobility Design Guide

Fresno

Fresno

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Safety (Vision Zero)

The project will result in the development of a City of Fresno Mobility Design Guide for the City of Fresno, a critical and consolidated resource document centralizing design elements, specifications, and standards for mobility related engineering design, layout, and uses within our community’s streets, bike lanes, intersections, sidewalks, trails, and crosswalks including but not limited to bicycle and pedestrian facilities, personal mobility devices, transit, and mobility hubs to complement the existing plans such as the Active Transportation Plan, Safe Streets and Roads for All, and the Vision Zero Plan. Project deliverables include community engagement to help scope and steer the development and final production of an “all in one” toolbox in a singular location for users of all kinds including: residents, planners, architects, engineers, educators, developers, event planners, senior housing, shopping centers, the Active Transportation Advisory Committee (ATAC), the City of Fresno Disability Advisory Commission, and more.

$309,855

6

Climate Adaptation Planning

County of Fresno

Western Fresno County Climate Adaptation Plan

Fresno

Coalinga, Firebaugh, Huron, Mendota, San Joaquin

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

A study of the western unincorporated communities (west of Highways 99 and 41 to the County line) and overlapping cities will be performed to plan for the resilience of transportation infrastructure due to flooding, drought, subsidence, and other climate-related causes. When storm events occur, the roads can flood and impact thousands of residents trying to get to school, work, and access to other vital resources. This area of study was chosen due to its high flood risk and high concentration of underserved communities. Deliverables include a report with scoping, cost estimates, and a list of priority projects with feasibility of recommended actions, identified through a scientific and public process that considers cost, equity, long-term resiliency, and potential environmental impact.

$1,500,000

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

County of Fresno

Fresno County Safe Routes to School Action Plan

Fresno County

Various locations in Fresno County

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition

At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Safety (Vision Zero)

Fresno County proposes a Safe Routes to School Assessment Study that will result in Action Plan, to carefully evaluate the most critical transportation issues students face at 20 selected schools located in or adjacent to unincorporated Fresno County (see Exhibit A). The selection of schools was based on outreach conducted by the Fresno Council of Governments (FCOG)to schools and districts. The Action Plan will develop feasible solutions that have immediate and positive impacts on the safety and comfort of children traveling to school. This study will result in a Safety Action Plan providing crash analysis, a toolbox of proven safety countermeasures, pathways to implementation, and a robust transportation safety education program, including engaging students, staff, parents, community members, and relevant authorities in the assessment and planning process.

$400,000

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Fresno Council of Governments

Fresno County Regional Rail Feasibility Study

Fresno County

Firebaugh, Fowler, Fresno, Kerman, Kingsburg, Mendota, Reedley, Sanger, San Joaquin, Selma

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

This study will analyze the feasibility of a zero-emission regional rail system in Fresno County, primarily connecting the communities of Fresno, Firebaugh, Kerman, Mendota, Reedley, San Joaquin, Fowler, Selma, Kingsburg, and Sanger, as well as the Tulare County community of Dinuba which is just over the Fresno-Tulare County border from Reedley. The study will include an analysis of zero emission vehicle technology and operational capability to operate this rail system without any greenhouse gas emissions or air pollutants. Ridership modeling will occur to determine feasibility of the rail system, and the study will evaluate a phased implementation approach if it is demonstrated that a regional rail system is viable from a ridership and operational cost perspective. This study aims to plan for connectivity and accessibility of sustainable, quality transportation for underserved communities.

$300,000

6

Climate Adaptation Planning

Fresno Council of Governments

Fresno County Extreme Heat Analysis and Shade Adaptation Plan

Fresno County

Clovis, Coalinga, County of Fresno, Firebaugh, Fowler, Fresno, Huron, Kerman, Kingsburg, Mendota, Orange Cove, Parlier, Reedley, San Joaquin, Sanger, Selma

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The Fresno Council of Governments will develop an Extreme Heat Analysis and Shade Adaptation Plan for Fresno County. The plan will include an extreme heat vulnerability analysis, which will provide valuable data for future adaptation and mitigation responses to extreme heat induced by climate change. The plan will also identify native and drought tolerant tree canopy and vegetative cover improvement projects in communities most vulnerable to extreme heat based on the extreme heat vulnerability analysis and bike and pedestrian traffic analysis. This plan will inform general plans, other long-range plans, and the design and retrofit of future and present infrastructure. The parties involved in this project will be Fresno COG, the 16 local governments in Fresno County, community organizations, and the general public.

$221,325

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Fresno County Rural Transit Agency

Fresno County Transit Roadmap

Fresno County

Coalinga, Firebaugh, Fowler, Huron, Kerman, Kingsburg, Mendota, Orange Cove, Parlier, Reedley, San Joaquin, Sanger, Selma

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

This project would work with disadvantaged communities to identify existing transportation service gaps through a comprehensive evaluation of FCRTA’s operations in the 13 rural cities and 39 unincorporated areas of Fresno County. It then evaluates strategies to reimagine service through a coordinated approach with land use plans and affordable housing. The project would also recommend fare structures for new service models to best meet community needs.

It would also evaluate new technology to replace FCRTA’s existing scheduling and rider trip planning software. There is also a lack of transit awareness in Fresno County. This project would also include developing strategies for marketing, communication, and partnerships that have the potential to streamline service operations and promote ridership.

The outcome would be an actionable roadmap for FCRTA with strategies to cost-effectively provide better service to ensure transit is a viable option for those that need it most, increase access and equity, grow ridership, and leverage FCRTA’s capital investments, such as its new maintenance facility and microgrids and the SR99 Transit Feasibility Study.

$266,000

6

Climate Adaptation Planning

Kern Council of Governments

Kern Trans-Sierra transit Climate Adaptation Plan

Kern

City of Arvin, California City, Kern County, McFarland, Ridgecrest, Shafter, Taft, Tehachapi, and Wasco

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

To reduce the impacts of climate change (closure of mountain passes and flooded roads) the County of Kern (Kern Transit), the rural transit operators, and the social services transportation providers are partnering to conduct a multi- hazard risk assessment of each partner's transportation systems, generate possible adaptation solutions , create a prioritized list of projects using a multi-criteria analysis, and develop an implementation plan for integrating climate change adaptation into the capital improvement process. The project will provide Kern Transit, the rural transit operators, social services operators, and high-speed rail operating within the Kern region with a short-range transit development plan (TDP), a Coordinated Human Services Transportation Plan, and a prioritized list of actionable efforts and projects to reduce climate change impacts on our transportation systems. CalStart will provide an analysis of zero- emission vehicle scenarios for Kern Transit and Eastern Sierra Transit Authority's service through mountain passes.

Priorities will be co-created with community input working toward the goals to make transportation systems more reliant to climate change; benefit the health, safety, mobility, and equity of transportation workforces and the general population; and fulfill climate change mitigation and adaptation objectives of many local, regional, and state plans.

$1,050,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Madera County

Madera Safe Routes to School Plan Development Project

Madera

Madera

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Safety (Vision Zero)

Madera County (County) intends to work in partnership with Madera Unified School District (MUSD) and the City of Madera (City) to prepare a Safe Routes to School Plan (SRTS Plan) covering the MUSD service area within the city and surrounding communities in the County. Development of this SRTS Plan would be a multipronged effort under which MUSD, along with the County and City, would assess the location, conditions, and issues of existing pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicle facilities along road segments that provide important linkages between each MUSD school and residential areas – the routes used by students to get to and from school. The project would identify gaps in the motorized and non-motorized infrastructure and recommend design improvement options (e.g., sidewalk connectivity, pedestrian and road safety features, bicycle facilities, education programs, etc.) that would provide an opportunity to make walking and bicycling to MUSD schools safer and more accessible for children, including those with disabilities, and to increase the number of children who choose to walk and bicycle. On a long term basis, completion of the SRTS Plan and resulting construction projects to address the improvements recommended in the plan, would ease traffic congestion near various MUSD schools, improve air quality, enhance children’s health and well-being and improve community members’ overall quality of life in the City of Madera and Madera County, while providing a blueprint for similar efforts in other cities and communities within the County and wider San Joaquin Valley region.

$700,000

6

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

Tulare County Association of Governments

Equity-based Zero Emissions Regional Transportation Study

Tulare County

Visalia, Tulare County, Dinuba, Woodlake, Tule River Indian Reservation, Farmersville, Tulare, Lindsay and Porterville

 

Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.) Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The Tulare County Region not only plays a vital role in the global agricultural market, spanning roughly 4,900 square miles, but is home to approximately 473,000 residents of whom many are low-income households, live in areas with the worst air quality in the nation and commonly pay the price with asthma medication, respiratory illness or determinantal conditions such as lung cancer. (Due to the nature of the agricultural economy with heavy-duty diesel trucks and the geographic dispersion of communities with a high level of vehicles miles traveled (VMT), the Tulare County Region has fallen behind in implementing key state goals, in particular, zero-emission transportation technology. However, this region suffers from the poorest air quality in the nation and combined with the effects of climate change, the need for zero-emissions technologies is proving to be a critical long-term solution to dramatically improve the air quality and help decelerate the rate of climate change. This project therefore is a necessary first step before deployment of zero-emission vehicle technologies that could significantly reverse the effects from petroleum powered transportation. In particular, this study would result in an analysis of the Tulare County Region’s power grid capacity and hydrogen energy infrastructure to ensure affordable and reliable zero-emissions vehicles (ZEV) for our disadvantaged communities and result in a recommendation of the appropriate ZE transportation solutions that would best fulfill the daily mobility needs of our member agencies, transit fleets, goods movement, and private sectors.

$200,000

6

Climate Adaptation Planning

Tulare County Association of Governments

Valley Transport Resiliency Advancement for Neighborhoods' Sustainable FReight Movement (V- TRANSFRM) Study

Fresno County, Kern County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County, Tulare County

Bakersfield, Fresno, Madera, Modesto, Visalia

Rural Communities Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.)

The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) is the freight backbone through one of the most productive agricultural, yet most economically disadvantaged regions in the nation; State Route 99, Interstate 5, their many connecting corridors, and the parallel Union Pacific (UP)/Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) make up the central segment of the nationally significant West U.S. north-south freight corridor. The objective of this study is to assess the climate change vulnerabilities of the SJV corridor and resiliency connectors, and to leverage and advance critical transportation infrastructure projects that implement adaptive climate measures. The study will focus on three main components: 1) Vulnerability/Risk/Resiliency Assessment; 2) Adaptation actions/Co-Benefit Analysis; and 3) Expedite Implementation. Partners and collaborators will include local disadvantaged communities, freight corridor stakeholders, and agencies including Caltrans Districts 6, 9 & 10, and the 8-San Joaquin Valley MPOs to ensure that the adaptation measures are effective. The goal is to expedite implementation of climate adaptation actions that reduce impacts of increasing extreme weather events, enhancing freight transportation resilience, and realizing the co-benefits for all communities in this economically disadvantaged corridor.

$3,000,000

7

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Artesia

Artesia Climate Ready: A Pathway to Climate Action & Adaptation

Los Angeles

Artesia

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016)

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Corridor (Local or Regional) Other

The City of Artesia proposes to develop a Climate Action and Adaptation Plan (CAAP), aimed at assessing and adapting to the impacts of climate change, with a particular emphasis on enhancing the resilience of the city's transportation system against events like heatwaves, wildfires, and flooding. The primary goal is to develop a Climate Action & Adaptation Plan for Artesia, focusing on strengthening the city's transportation infrastructure and help plan for extreme weather events, such as evacuation planning. The City will leverage partnerships with the Gateway Cities Council of Governments and Southern California Association of Governments and use their respective Climate Adaptation Frameworks as guides for the City’s CAAP. Key Deliverables include a Vulnerability Assessment, GHG Emissions Inventory, Evacuation Assessment and Strategy Plan, and the development of a Climate Action & Adaptation Plan.

$342,036

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Gardena

GTrans Comprehensive Operations Analysis

Los Angeles County

Gardena

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The City of Gardena GTrans is seeking $442,650 from the California Department of Transportation’s Sustainable Transportation Planning Grant Program to funds the GTrans Comprehensive Operations Analysis Project. With the goal of increasing system ridership, it is critical that GTrans evaluate its current service and routing to ensure it is aligned with the new, post-COVID-19-pandemic era ridership patterns. Along with recent and planned developments and trip generators, this in-depth analysis will help determine how GTrans’ existing service (alignment, performance, reliability, and frequency) can become a more attractive option for current and new customers. The analysis will then be translated into phased improvements that will ultimately increase transit ridership, and improve air quality and mobility for the underserved communities in which GTrans traverses.

$442,650

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of Long Beach Department of Community Development

Everyone’s Coast: Zoning Update and Mobility Plan

Los Angeles County

City of Long Beach

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Other

The Everyone’s Coast: Zoning Update and Mobility Plan (Project Type: Integrated Housing, Land Use, and Transportation) will improve coastal access for marginalized communities through an affordable housing and transportation equity lens. The project will leverage recent capacity-building efforts with low-income communities of color in Central Long Beach to develop a community access study along with a prioritized list of transportation projects and recommendations that will improve connectivity to high resource areas and amenities near the coast. The project will also expand affordable housing opportunities within the City’s Coastal Zone by updating zoning regulations and the Local Coastal Plan to implement the City’s 2019 Land Use Element and 2022 Housing Element, which facilitate greater density and mix of compatible uses, consistent with the SCAG RTP/SCS, state climate goals and guidance, and planning best practices. Project engagement will be informed by a broad spectrum of perspectives from community- based organizations, youth, advocates, and community leaders using a neighborhood empowerment framework that will delve into the inextricable connections between land use, transportation, infrastructure, and housing. The timing of this proposed effort allows for unique leveraging of opportunities through investments for the 2028 Olympic Games to pilot and prioritize transportation projects and strategies.

$690,000

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Santa Fe Springs

Town Center Telegraph Corridor (TCTC) Specific Plan

Los Angeles County

City of Santa Fe Springs

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Corridor (Local or Regional) General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The Project is to complete a Specific Plan along Telegraph Road, a major commercial corridor, and create a Town Center, as the geographic heart of the community, by facilitating high-density residential projects within newly created mixed-use zones. The Project will fulfill and implement the policies, goals, and objectives of the 2040 General Plan, adopted in 2022, which was partially funded with Department of Transportation (DOT) SB-1 planning grant funds. The proposed specific plan is the logical next step to accelerate housing production and reduce VMT and GHG emissions. The land use within the 98.7-acre Project Area was recently changed from Industrial to Mixed-Use Corridor and Mixed- Use Downtown, which will bring diverse housing options within walking distance of thousands of jobs, medical and professional services, and other life necessities. The City is leveraging a SCAG grant ($800,000), awarded in January 2024, for the same project area as this grant application, to complete construction specs and plans to increase the capacity of public utilities to meet the increased utilities demand of high-density residential and mixed-use projects, and urban green infrastructure to promote walkability and to capture and retain stormwater runoff. The Project fulfills regional, state, and federal housing targets, transportation plans, and GHG reduction targets.

$673,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Los Angeles County

Los Angeles County Unincorporated Area Truck Routes Master Plan (TRMP)

Los Angeles County

LA County Unincorporated areas

Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Corridor (Local or Regional) Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.)

Los Angeles County Public Works (Public Works) is requesting for funding for developing a truck route map and associated ordinances to ensure trucks are restricted to appropriate roadways throughout the unincorporated LA County; ultimately Public Works will create an Unincorporated Areas (UA) of Los Angeles County Truck Route Master Plan (TRMP) for the unincorporated communities in the Los Angeles County. The goal of this Plan is to close the gap between the existing truck routes in other jurisdictions within the County region and create a well-connected truck route network while addressing equity and safety Countywide. This will be a collaborative effort with all the neighboring jurisdiction to assure this plan is consistent with their already-in-place truck route plans and ordinances.

$700,000

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Montebello

Transit-Oriented Communities/Multimodal Connectivity Speciflc Plan

Los Angeles County

City of Montebello

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Other

Montebello’s proposed Transit-Oriented Communities/Multimodal Connectivity Specific Plan (TOC/MC) Specific Plan project seeks to address connectivity challenges within its disadvantaged community to the proposed transit stations and stops, retail and commercial centers, schools, parks, and recreation center while improving safety for residents and active transportation users.

The City currently does not have an existing TOC Specific Plan nor a multimodal connectivity plan, making it crucial to immediately address critical gaps in housing, transit accessibility, active transportation, transportation to schools, parks, transit, and employment centers while addressing regional connectivity into nearby communities of Commerce, Bell Gardens, and Pico Rivera, as well as frequented destinations such as City Hall, downtown Montebello, and the Commerce/Montebello Metrolink Regional Rail Station.

Montebello's proposed TOC/MC Specific Plan aims to improve housing inventories and the active transportation network in the local low-income neighborhoods.

Montebello's proposed TOC/MC Specific Plan aims to improve housing inventories and the active transportation network in the local low-income neighborhoods.

The project will serve as a comprehensive planning document to 1) guide future land use development and transportation access for the disadvantaged community surrounding the Washington/Greenwood community (future home to the Metro Eastside Light Rail Station), 2) to ultimately establish priority needs and feasible project options for implementing active transportation mode-shift in an otherwise vehicle dominant community, and 3) allow for the City to implement equitable, complete first-last mile connections to neighborhoods, housing projects, transit, employment centers, schools, parks, and more.

Key deliverables for the project include the Mobility Study, Stakeholder/Community Engagement Plan, Equity Study, Draft and Final Montebello TOC/MC Specific Plan, and updates to the general plan, zoning, land use designations, and housing elements.

$442,650

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive

South Bay Cities Council of Governments

"Gap" Study to Support Connectivity of the South Bay Local Travel Network in Underserved Communities

Los Angeles

Carson, Lomita, San Pedro (City of Los Angeles Council District 15)

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Safety (Vision Zero)

The South Bay Cities Council of Governments is implementing a 243-mile network on existing low volume, slow speed, mixed-mode streets branded as the South Bay Local Travel Network. When fully implemented, the LTN will provide safe routes encouraging mode-shift to slow-speed sustainable zero-emission devices with maximum speed of 25 MPH

- connecting all 12 coastal and inland cities in the sub-region.

Network "gaps" have been identified in underserved South Bay cities and are an equity and environmental issue. This project will develop plans (with community engagement) to mitigate these “Gaps” (on streets that are too fast, have a high volume of traffic, and have higher traffic incidents). Plans, developed from this project, will provide cities with safe facilities planning as a way to mitigate these issues and, ultimately, provide their respective communities to accrue the sustainability and safety community benefits that a fully connected LTN and zero-emission micromobility mode-shift present.

$492,000

7

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

South Coast Air Quality Management District (South Coast AQMD)

Expanding and Updating the Statewide GHG/VMT Toolkit for a Post- Pandemic California

Statewide

Statewide

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

This project proposes to add five new transportation measures, incorporate new datasets, add reporting options, and increase the functionality of into two widely used tools for local governments and state agencies across California - The California Emissions Estimator Model (CalEEMod) and the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association (CAPCOA) Quantifying GHG Mitigation Measures Handbook (CAPCOA Handbook). These tools are central to modeling future transportation behavior and vehicle miles traveled for land use and transportation projects and specific, master, and general plans, with CalEEMod.com receiving over 69,000 views per month. Developed during the pandemic and heavily cited by the Caltrans SB 743 mitigation playbook and VMT+ calculator, it is critical to incorporate post-pandemic datasets so a primary tool used for CEQA compliance can continue to be reflective of California's regulatory environment and current conditions. Key parties involved will be the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association and their technical consultant, other California air districts, and the CalEEMod user base.

$450,000

7

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

Southern California Association of Governments

Southern California Airport Passenger Surface Transportation Study

SCAG Region (Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura)

SCAG Region (Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura)

 

Corridor (Local or Regional) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The proposed airport passenger surface transportation study seeks to better understand and explain the perspectives and behavior of passengers and employees traveling and to and from the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) region’s airports, including developing actionable recommendations for ground transportation and alternative connections to airports. To obtain this information, the study will utilize a survey of airport passengers and employees, semi-structured interviews of airport officials, additional data sources and forms of data collection, and analyses of the data collected. Many of these airports are currently in the process of developing landside access modernization, replacement terminal, people mover, and other facilities and infrastructure projects that will include airport ground access elements, which would benefit from additional airport passenger data and information. In addition to the commercial service airports, the study will also look at select reliever airports in the region that connect or may potentially connect to the medium and larger hub airports via air taxis and other new technologies, such as advanced air mobility (AAM) and regional air mobility (RAM). In some cases, these reliever airports are also strategically located near existing or proposed multimodal connections, such as high-speed and passenger rail. The work products of this project, which will include survey results, write-ups, briefings, and reports, will be made available to Caltrans, the airports, transportation agencies, and the public.

$500,000

7

Strategic Partnerships (FHWA SPR

Part I)

Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG)

Planning for Main Streets

Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino

Anaheim, Brawley, Lomita, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Stanton

 

Corridor (Local or Regional) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

Caltrans recently updated Main Street, California: A Guide for People-Centered State Highway Main Streets, which is shaped by five guiding principles that reflect the State’s strategic goals and forms the basis of the Planning for Main Streets project: foster people-centered transportation infrastructure; improve safety and public health; elevate equity and livability; advance sustainability and climate action; and engage communities, partners, and stakeholders. SCAG, in partnership with Caltrans Districts 7, 8, 11, and 12, identified several State highways in the SCAG region that function as main streets, which are defined as State highways that are community streets, given their existing and planned land uses, related projects, and community priorities. SCAG proposes to partner with Caltrans Districts 7, 8, 11, and 12 and local jurisdictions to implement Caltrans’ Main Street principles and planning processes for several State highway main streets corridors in the SCAG region. The Planning for Main Streets project will assess existing conditions, engage with communities to define each corridor vision and corridor priorities, and develop conceptual plans and associated cost estimates for sustainable transportation improvements to position Caltrans and local jurisdictions for future grant funding opportunities and/or incorporation into future workplans with the goal of implementing improvements.

$500,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

8

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

City of Banning, Department of Public Works

Zero-Emission Vehicle Fleet and Infrastructure Transition Action Plan

Riverside

Banning

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition)

The City of Banning requests $309,850.00 to develop a Zero-Emission Vehicle Fleet and Infrastructure Transition Action Plan (Plan) to address electrification of its municipal fleet, including Banning Connect, the city-run transit bus system, which had an estimated ridership of 65,898 residents in the 2022/2023 fiscal year. Banning (population 30,683) is located in Riverside County, approximately 84 miles east of Los Angeles, and spans 23.2 square miles, with 9,950 residents living in disadvantaged census tracts. The City proposes to develop a plan assessing both fleet electrification and zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) charging infrastructure to identify needed projects such as constructing ZEV charging locations, choosing vehicles to be transitioned, purchasing appropriate, cost-effective ZEVs, and creating a comprehensive strategy for action. The City’s study will serve as a guide for implementing changes in support of California’s goal of achieving 100% zero-emission medium and heavy-duty vehicles by 2045, which will reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) created by the City fleet, thereby improving air quality, providing greater transport equity for residents, and ensuring that the City’s services can continue to serve the community with efficiency and integrity.

Key project stakeholders include Banning Electric Utility, Banning Unified School District, Southern California Public Power Authority (SCPPA), Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), and Caltrans.

$309,850

8

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Jurupa Valley

Jurupa Valley Freight Analysis

Riverside

Jurupa Valley

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Freight/Goods Movement (Truck, Rail, etc.) Other

Jurupa Valley requests $400,000 to develop a Freight Analysis in partnership with disadvantaged residents, the Southern California Association of Governments, Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), Eastern Riverside County Association of Governments, Sheriff and Fire, Jurupa Unified School District and the Riverside Bicycle Club, among others. The City is an inland port with one of its hubs having over 90 warehouses and visited by15,000 daily trucks. Balancing community concerns and the economic benefit of freight is an ongoing challenge that the Freight Analysis will address. Deliverables include a comprehensive Freight Analysis that furthers the California Freight Mobility Plan, California Sustainable Freight Action Plan, California’s Climate Change Executive Order (E.O.) N-19-19, SCAG’s Regional Transportation Plan Sustainable Communities Strategy, and Riverside County Transportation Commission’s Regional Transportation Plan.

$400,000

8

Climate Adaptation Planning

City of Palm Springs

Palm Springs Comprehensive Shade and Heat Mitigation Plan for Multi-modal Transportation

Riverside

Palm Springs

Native American Tribal Governments Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The Palm Springs Comprehensive Shade and Heat Mitigation Plan for Multi-modal Transportation will focus on sustainable and resilient transportation planning to mitigate and adapt to extreme heat events experienced in the Coachella Valley, where daily summer temperatures regularly exceed 100F. The projects aims to build a plan that identify strategies to enhances adaptive multi-modal infrastructure, build resilient communities and overall reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project's key deliverables include a community and stakeholder engagement plan (with a focus on underserved and vulnerable populations), a heat and shade equity study, heat impact assessment, as well as design plans for adaptive climate-appropriate shade structures and landscape designs along transportation routes. The strategic components align with local, regional and state planning efforts to address climate change and reduce overall carbon emissions including the State Climate Action Plan and the Riverside County 2019 Climate Action Plan.

$400,000

8

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Riverside Transit Agency

Improving Connectivity to Public Transportation: ADA Bus Stop Enhancement Plan

Riverside County

Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Murrieta, Moreno Valley, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula, Wildomar, and the unincorporated areas of Riverside County Supervisorial Districts I, II, III and V

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Safety (Vision Zero) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) is requesting funding for the development of the Improving Connectivity to Public Transportation: Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Bus Stop Enhancement Plan (Project) which will evaluate RTA’s service area and identify some of the oldest bus stops that need enhancements to meet ADA requirements. With over 2,600 active bus stops, an estimated 289 of RTA’s oldest bus stops are not ADA compliant. The Project will develop a phased implementation plan to bring the estimated 289 bus stops throughout RTA’s service area into ADA compliance. These older stops lack the proper infrastructure and/or require updates to ensure safe, equitable access to public transportation, especially for seniors and individuals with disabilities. This study is in line with and will help achieve goals identified in the Riverside County Transportation Commission’s (RCTC) 2021-2025 Coordinated Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Plan for Riverside County, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Connect SoCal Plan, and the California Transportation Plan (CTP) 2050.

$255,000

8

Climate Adaptation Planning

San Bernardino County Transportation Authority

SBCTA Evacuation and Resilience Center Design Study

San Bernardino County

Fontana/Rancho Cucamonga/Uplan d, Lytle Creek, Phelan, Pinon Hills, Wrightwood

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) requests $725,000 to hire an experienced consultant to develop an Evacuation and Resilience Center Design Study (Study) building upon the recently funded Caltrans Emergency Evacuation Network Resilience (EENR) Study and as a compliment to the IE Resilience Tool Kit. The Study will conduct local-level evacuation compliance assessments identifying residential communities in hazardous areas that lack at least two access routes for emergency use, and will include a feasibility study evaluating strategies to improve access to and from these areas during climate-related emergencies. Additionally, locations for new Resilience Centers equipped with microgrids (Centers) to temporarily provide shelter during climate-related events will be identified in these communities. Planning and prioritization of transportation projects is often simply too burdensome for these local agencies, which are already stretched thin with staffing and budgets. Deliverables will include 1) Recommended strategies for evacuation access, redundancy, etc., on local transportation routes within the five (5) selected pilot communities (See Exhibits 3-6); 2) Preliminary concept drawings (30% design) for new Resiliency Centers; and 3) Funding strategies for future implementation.

$725,000

10

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Mariposa County Local Transportation Commission

The Mariposa Town Transit & Economic Development Initiative

Mariposa County

Mariposa

Rural Communities At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016)

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The Mariposa Town Transit & Economic Development Initiative will identify a new transit strategy, focused on improving parking availability and increasing public transit ridership, in the Mariposa Town Planning Area (TPA). Major deliverables include recommendations for (1) improving existing parking and expanding parking inventory in the Town’s commercial area, (2) increasing Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System use, and (3) enhancing the pedestrian experience in Mariposa’s downtown corridor. These deliverables will help drive economic activity to a disadvantaged, low-income community, while reducing congestion, VMT, and GHG emissions.

The Mariposa County Local Transportation Commission is the primary responsible party, with additional partners including a Downtown Transit Steering Committee, County Departments, Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System, and Caltrans District 10 staff.

The project advances planning efforts in the Mariposa County's Regional Transportation Plan (2023), YARTS Strategic Plan (2021), Mariposa County’s Integrated Mobility and Housing Strategy (2023), Transportation Center + Active Transportation Feasibility Study (2019), Mariposa Economic Vitality Strategy (2017), elements of the California Transportation Plan 2040 (2016) and Caltrans District 10 System Management Plan (2015).

$198,463

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

10

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

Merced County Association of Governments

Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System Manufacturer Collaboration and Regional Connectivity

Fresno, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, Tuolumne

Merced

 

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

This Coach Manufacturer Collaboration and Expanded Regional Connectivity planning project proposed by the Merced County Association of Governments (MCAG) in support of the Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System (YARTS) is critical to meet the State of California’s Innovative Clean Fleets mandates.

The project consists of a comprehensive and systematic quantitative evaluation and design of technological, logistical, financial, and regional aspects involved in developing and integrating a yet-to-exist long distance, zero-emission coach bus for YARTS, as well as assessing regional opportunities for shared fueling or energizing connectivity and solutions throughout the central Sierra Nevada and foothills.

YARTS will be the prime applicant and CALSTART, a 501(c)(3) transportation nonprofit, will operate as the sub- applicant. The study is essential for maintaining and expanding YARTS’ role in connecting local through federal transportation networks in a shared vision and actions towards zero emissions transit centered on an environmentally, socially, recreationally, and historically esteemed destination.

The project’s roots in transportation equity and climate resilience are connected to and echo multiple efforts across scales, from local counties’ Regional Transportation Plans and Sustainable Communities Strategies to Caltrans’ Complete Streets to the recent Federal Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

$368,200

10

Climate Adaptation Planning

San Joaquin Council of Governments

Flood Adaptation Strategy for State Route 4 through the San Joaquin Delta River

San Joaquin County

Unincorporated San Joaquin County

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), in partnership with Caltrans District 10, will develop a Flood Adaptation Strategy for State Route 4 (SR-4) through the San Joaquin Delta River. SR-4 is at high flood risk as it (1) runs through FEMA’s 100-year floodplain (2) serves as a goods movement connector and commuter route (3) and acts as an evacuation route for San Joaquin River Delta residents. This proposed study will assess flood impact, including the impact a flood event in the San Joaquin River Delta will have on evacuation routing, and generate a list of priority flood-resilient capital improvement projects that SJCOG in partnership with Caltrans District 10 could program on SR-4. This Flood Adaptation Strategy was identified as a Priority Adaptation Strategy in the agency’s 2022 Regional Resiliency Implementation Plan and Adaptation Guidance and aligns with state and federal climate and transportation priorities.

$340,840

10

Strategic Partnerships (FTA 5304)

San Joaquin Council of Governments

Lodi Multimodal Transportation Network and Land Use Compatibility Action Plan

San Joaquin County

City of Lodi

Regional/Local Definition At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), in association with the City of Lodi (City), has initiated a study in preparation for the development of the Lodi Multimodal Transportation Network and Land Use Compatibility Action Plan (Plan). The Plan will identify current and future rail systems, multimodal networks, and increased connectivity and developmental land usage within the Plan scope area. This will involve directly engaging underserved communities regarding employment access, housing and business opportunities, cost-effective travel for non-vehicle owners, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities, and expanding regional transportation services. Plan development will expand local and regional connectivity, support the economic development of wine tourism, and encourage residents to utilize multimodal travel options for regional commutes to work and recreation. This process will be guided by the Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework, Complete Streets strategies, Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI), and other design and policy principles.

$450,000

10

Sustainable Communities Competitive

San Joaquin County

August Sustainable Community Plan

San Joaquin County

Unincorporated

At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Complete Streets (Multimodal Specific Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

The August Sustainable Community Plan (Plan) will create a community vision for multi-modal connectivity improvements within the community of August. The Plan will focus on sustainable transportation improvements by centering on existing and future community assets and needs related to accessible health, nutrition, education, human services, housing assistance, and employment opportunities of this Disadvantaged Community. The Plan focuses on facilitating the movement of people and goods between job centers and the community through alternative modes of transportation. The Plan includes extensive outreach, implementation of complete street designs, circulation recommendations, and investment strategies for future project construction.

This Plan will be consistent with the goals of the San Joaquin Council of Governments 2022 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS)(Envision 2050), Smart Mobility Framework, California Transportation Plan 2040, California Bike/Pedestrian Plan, San Joaquin County Bicycle Master Plan Update (2020), and the Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI).

$417,198

10

Sustainable Communities Competitive

San Joaquin Joint Powers Authority

San Joaquin Valley Network Integration and Transit-Oriented Development Action Plan

Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare

Regional project encompassing multiple cities

Rural Communities Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75%

CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0 At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The San Joaquin Joint Powers Authority (SJJPA) will lead the San Joaquin Valley Network Integration and Transit- Oriented Development Action Plan (Plan). This Plan is a consolidated planning effort with key regional partners – San Joaquin Regional Rail Commission (SJRRC), San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), Stanislaus Council of Governments (StanCOG), Merced County Association of Governments (MCAG), Madera County Transportation Commission (MCTC), Fresno Council of Governments (Fresno COG), Kings County Association of Governments (KCAG), Tulare County Association of Governments (TCAG), Kern Council of Governments (KCOG), California High- Speed Rail Authority (CHSRA), and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). The Plan will expand connectivity options between High-Speed Rail’s (HSR) Bakersfield to Merced segment, SJRRC’s Altamont Corridor Express (ACE) service along the new Valley Rail corridor in the San Joaquin Valley, SJJPA’s Amtrak San Joaquins (San Joaquins) service from Bakersfield to Sacramento, the Cross-Valley Corridor, and other transit and passenger rail services within the San Joaquin Valley. The Plan will integrate these existing and future passenger rail services, improve transit performance, and support station-area development and transit-oriented development (TOD). The Plan builds on the principles and guidance set forth by the Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework, Complete Streets strategies, Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI), California State Rail Plan, and California Transportation Plan (CTP) 2050. The Plan involves engaging underserved communities and stakeholder working groups (SWG) to develop transportation and land use recommendations, reduce transportation barriers, and increase regional mobility options for the San Joaquin Valley.

$600,000

10

Climate Adaptation Planning

Stanislaus County

Tri-County Transportation Resiliency Plan

San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Merced Counties

Three-County Wide Study

At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Climate Change (Adaptation, Vulnerability, etc.)

The Tri-County Transportation Resiliency Plan (Plan) will address the next phase of activities identified in regional and statewide resiliency plans. Because disasters and infrastructure cross jurisdictional boundaries, the Tri-County Plan will be a collaborative effort between three counties that share common hazards, specifically flooding of the San Joaquin River. The Plan will help the local agencies and members of these communities to be proactive and resilient in the face of extreme weather. Resilience will be gained by advancing the work completed in recent plans, prioritizing projects with the greatest regional impact, and increasing community awareness of adaptation strategies.

$529,232

11

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of San Diego

Mid-City Multimodal Mobility Plan

County of San Diego

City of San Diego

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

General Plan Elements (Multimodal Spec. Type) Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport)

This grant will fund the development of a multimodal mobility plan (project) for the Mid-City Communities in the City of San Diego (City), which will support the Mid-City Communities Plan Update. The City, in partnership with the non-profit organization, CivicWell, will conduct an extensive community engagement effort to meaningfully engage the diverse and economically disadvantaged populations in the Mid-City Communities, develop short and long-term multimodal safety and access improvements, and develop streetscape concepts for high frequency transit corridors in the Mid-City Communities. The project will use a complete streets approach to identify improvements addressing safety for bicyclists and pedestrians, improve first-mile/last-mile connectivity to existing and planned transit, and increase multimodal connections to neighboring communities. This project is crucial for the City to achieve its regional and State goals to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, ensure a sustainable and equitable regional transportation system, and promote economic development and increase opportunities for infill housing within walking distance to high frequency transit corridors and major transit stops.

$600,000

 

Caltrans District

Grant Category

Primary Applicant Organization Legal Name

 

Project Title

Project Location County

Project Location City

 

Underserved Communites Definitions

 

Project Type

 

Project Description

Grant Request

11

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Vista

Vista Sustainable Mobility Plan

San Diego

Vista

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550 (Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CA School Meals Data At/Below 25% CA Healthy Places Index

Active Transportation (Bicycle and Pedestrian) Complete Streets (Multimodal Specific Type)

Vista's Sustainable Mobility Plan aims to expedite the adoption of complete streets, prioritizing projects that improve safety, accessibility, and convenience for pedestrians, cyclists, and public transit users. The city-wide assessment will engage a diverse range of stakeholders, including residents from underserved communities and government agencies, to assess existing infrastructure and identify areas for improvement. By quantifying the benefits and prioritizing projects, the plan will ensure that the most crucial initiatives receive specialized attention, including feasibility assessments, design concepts, and cost estimates, to prepare them for implementation and funding opportunities. This comprehensive approach will help Vista create a more sustainable and accessible transportation network with the goal of reducing personal vehicle miles traveled. The final plan will coordinate all existing plans and projects for implementation, and add new projects identified through analysis and stakeholders.

$400,000

11

Sustainable Communities Competitive

North County Transit District

NCTD Gender Action Plan

San Diego

Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Escondido, Oceanside, San Marcos, Solana Beach, Vista

 

Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

NCTD seeks to develop a Gender Action Plan (GAP) throughout its service area as the mobility needs, concerns, and preferences of women and gender nonconforming groups (WGNC), particularly from historically marginalized communities, have not been accounted for in the planning, design, and operation of our system, leading to additional burden and risks in daily travel, such as recorded harassment, assaults, and hostile infrastructure (limited lighting, callboxes, etc.). The primary deliverable will be a “Gender Action Plan (GAP)” which will summarize the experiences of WGNC traveling via transit in NCTD’s service area through an analysis of existing data (Census block data, National Household Travel Survey), traditional outreach methods (on-board surveys and focus groups), and innovative data collection (participant observation, participant workshops, pop-up engagements, and ethnographic observations). This deliverable will produce action items that NCTD would incorporate to mitigate the mobility burden on WGNC through an outreach strategy, policy, operations, capital improvements, and an implementation plan. This study will be coordinated with input from the 9 jurisdictional entities (Cities of Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Escondido, Oceanside, San Marcos, Solana Beach, Vista and the County of San Diego), rural areas (including the Pala tribe), SANDAG (local MPO), local law enforcement, and community-based organizations (CBOs): Alliance for Regional Solutions (ARS) and Women’s Resource Center (WRC). This study and action plan aligns with SANDAG’s 2021 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) goal to achieve access to reliable, and safe mobility options, especially to “fix historic inequities... and prioritize improved access to basic needs and economic opportunities for people with the least access” (SANDAG RTP, 2021, p. 13) as well as aligning closely with the California Transportation Plan (CTP) 2050 and Caltrans 2020-2024 Strategic Plan goals of advancing equity, safety, and accessibility.

$367,591

11

Sustainable Communities Competitive (Technical)

North County Transit District

BREEZE 303 Transit Signal Priority Study

San Diego

Oceanside, Vista

 

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

In partnership with the cities of Oceanside and Vista, North County Transit District (NCTD) aims to enhance the travel time efficiency of its BREEZE bus service using advanced Transit Signal Priority (TSP) technology. This grant request seeks funding to conduct a comprehensive assessment of existing conditions and develop a strategic implementation plan to pilot TSP technology on NCTD’s top performing bus corridor, BREEZE 303, an initiative that builds upon the identified strategies and needs from NCTD’s BREEZE Speed & Reliability Study. NCTD will utilize this funding to identify priority intersection locations along the BREEZE 303 corridor to pilot this study and provide guidance on implementation and essential technologies for all stakeholders. This study will determine the most appropriate way to merge current signal systems with innovative multimodal intelligent transportation devices and proactive signal functions, enhancing the on-time performance (OTP) of the bus route through the TSP system. By streamlining TSP implementation guidelines and order of operations, it will allow for intentional development of TSP in the region, making it more effective in improving bus travel time competitiveness and OTP while improving safety for all users in the corridor, ultimately resulting in an incentive for mode shift towards public transit, reducing regional GHG and working towards the State GHG Reduction Targets.

$344,521

12

Sustainable Communities Competitive

City of Anaheim

Anaheim Canyon Microtransit Study

Orange

Anaheim

Regional/Local Definition At/Below 80% AB 1550

(Gomez, 2016) At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version

4.0

Multimodal (Motorized and Active Transport) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

The City of Anaheim (City) will develop the Anaheim Canyon Microtransit Study (ACMS) to evaluate the feasibility of using a microtransit service to provide first/last mile solutions in the Anaheim Canyon – the City’s second-largest employment center supporting over 42,000 workers (approximately 25% of the City’s workforce) covering a four- square-mile area in northeast Anaheim. The ACMS is necessary for three reasons: 1) critical first/last mile gaps are present between the Anaheim Canyon Metrolink Station and key Anaheim Canyon destinations, impeding mobility and access to transit and job centers (especially for disadvantaged workers with limited access to transportation); 2) the Anaheim Canyon Specific Plan (ACSP) was adopted in 2016, before recent changes in land use and development that are increasing businesses, workers, visitors, and residents in the area; and 3) sustainable growth in Anaheim Canyon - which includes accessible and equitable transportation options – is critical to the economic vitality and climate resiliency of the region. The City will conduct robust public engagement with surrounding residential neighborhoods (including disadvantaged communities and community-based organizations), Anaheim Canyon businesses and workers (including disadvantaged workers), local and regional transportation agencies, and other critical stakeholders. This input, combined with a thorough synthesis of study area conditions, will allow the City to develop a detailed Analysis of Demand, Optimal Service Recommendations, an Estimate of Required Costs, a Forecast of Long-Term Sustainability, and Conclusions and Recommendations on the feasibility of implementing a microtransit service in Anaheim Canyon. The resulting ACMS will address the need for increased mobility and accessibility in the Canyon, identified as a key stakeholder concern in the ACSP, and align with the goals of the City's General Plan and the Southern California Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCAG RTP/SCS).

$250,000

12

Sustainable Communities Competitive

Orange County Transportation Authority

Zero-Emission Bus Transition Plan

Orange County

All cities in Orange County incl. unincorporated areas

At/Above 75% CalEnviroScreen Version 4.0

Technical (Modeling, VMT Mitigation, ZEV/ZEB Infrastructure Transition) Transit (Bus/Light Rail/Commuter Rail Service)

In alignment with state regulations that prioritize projects that result in the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve air quality, OCTA is requesting funding to support the countywide Zero-Emission Bus (ZEB) Transition Plan (ZEB Transition Plan/Project). The Plan will include a thorough analysis to determine how OCTA can implement the necessary improvements, including system operations, equipment and infrastructure, to achieve 100 percent zero-emissions compliance with the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB’s) Innovation Clean Transit requirement of 100 percent zero-emission fleet by 2040. The Project will determine zero-emission technology or a combination of technologies appropriate for OCTA’s operations and study the feasibility of installing appropriate infrastructure into each facility.

OCTA will collaborate with local jurisdictions, transportation partner agencies, transit-users, diverse community organizations, schools, first responders, and residents throughout the process to ensure a thoughtful and robust transition from traditional transit fuel technologies to a modern zero-emission fleet of buses.

Deliverables include: (1) ZEB Fleet Options addressing the applicability of current and future ZEB technologies; including policy issues and recommendations that may present barriers or which could improve efficiency to transition to a zero-emission fleet; (2) Infrastructure Requirements identifying infrastructure requirements and improvements to existing facilities to achieve a zero-emission strategy; (3) Operating Cost Assumption estimating ongoing operating cost for the different ZEB technologies; (4) Updated ZEB Rollout Plan based on the 2020 ZEB Rollout Plan; (5) Implementation Phasing Report identifying a high-level schedule of construction and capital improvement activities required to achieve 100 percent ZEB compliance by 2040; (6) Financial Plan Report identifying high-level cost estimates for implementation; (7) Zero-Emission Bus Infrastructure Readiness Report; and (8) Vehicle and Fueling ZEB Technology Assessment Report providing conclusions and findings from the previous tasks in an integrated report that facilitates the implementation of the ZEB technologies, as well as an Executive Summary.

$200,000