Office of Smart Mobility and Climate Change

Overview

The Office of Smart Mobility and Climate Change (OSMCC) works to develop statewide tools, data, and resources needed to integrate active transportation, climate change and land use considerations into transportation planning and project development. The office stresses the need for community-sensitive approaches to transportation and land use decisions. OSMCC also works to enhance Caltrans’ leadership role in the development and delivery of transportation projects that are consistent with community values and therefore enjoy public support.

OSMCC consists of three branches that coordinate and collaborate with various stakeholders and Caltrans’ Districts and Divisions to produce technical studies, guidance, tools needed implement State initiatives and laws, and Department policies and strategic goals to achieve a multimodal transportation system. See below for more information on the OSMCC branches and deliverables. 

The Smart Mobility and Active Transportation (SMAT)

Branch works to implement smart mobility principles and performance measures to achieve complete streets and sustainable transportation and land use development. The Program works to operationalize the complete streets approach to deliver multimodal transportation facilities that provide transportation choices, create livable communities, and improve safety for all users. The SMAT Branch develops technical guidance and plans in addition to tools such as data, analytics and digital platforms to achieve objectives.

Major Branch Deliverables:

Smart Mobility 2010 – A Call to Action for the new Decade

Smart Mobility moves people and freight while enhancing California’s economic, environmental, and human resources by emphasizing convenient and safe multi-modal travel, speed suitability, accessibility, management of the circulation network and efficient use of land. This document introduces the Smart Mobility Framework (SMF) to assist with implementation of multi-modal and sustainable transportation strategies in California. The SMF helps guide and assess how well plans, programs, and projects meet a definition of smart mobility. Along with land use place types and modified performance measures, Smart Mobility 2010 provides tools and techniques that improve transportation by using the SMF principles to achieve sustainable outcomes.

Toward an Active California – State Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, 2017

First pedestrian and bicycle plan to continue progress toward a sustainable multimodal transportation system. Plan seeks to fulfill the six goals outlined in the California Transportation Plan 2040. Objectives and strategies developed focus on policies or actions that Caltrans, in collaboration with other agencies, can undertake to support active transportation.

Caltrans Active Transportation Plans - Releasing by year end 2023

These plans will identify active transportation asset needs on, across, or parallel to the State Highway System that will create multi-modal networks, which in almost all cases, will link SHS segments with segments of the local street system. The main deliverables are, by 2023, twelve equity focused District Active Transportation Plans and five online plan development workshops. Climate Change Branch Increasing temperatures, larger wildfires, heavier rain storms, rising sea levels and storm surge associated with climate change are a significant risk to our natural and human environment and to the State’s transportation infrastructure. The Climate Change Branch is responsible for overseeing the development, coordination, and implementation of climate change policies in all aspects of the Department’s decision making. It serves as a resource for technical assistance, training, information exchange, and partnership-building opportunities.

Climate Change Branch

Increasing temperatures, larger wildfires, heavier rain storms, rising sea levels and storm surge associated with climate change are a significant risk to our natural and human environment and to the State’s transportation infrastructure.

The Climate Change Branch is responsible for overseeing the development, coordination, and implementation of climate change policies in all aspects of the Department’s decision making. It serves as a resource for technical assistance, training, information exchange, and partnership-building opportunities. 

Major Branch Deliverables:

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments

Caltrans is conducting a statewide climate change vulnerability assessment to identify segments of the State Highway System vulnerable to climate change in all 12 Caltrans districts. The assessment projects future climate scenarios due to six climate change stressors that will quantify and map impacts and identify transportation assets at risk. The stressors studied include precipitation, temperature, wildfire, storm surge, cliff retreat, and sea level rise.

Climate Adaptation Strategy

Next step after the district vulnerability assessments is recommending adaptation strategies for integration into transportation investment decisions. Outputs from the Vulnerability Assessment models will be used to determine adaptation options and priorities for the most vulnerable segments of the roadway in the near- and long-term future.

Adaptation Planning Grants

$20 million of Senate Bill (SB) 1 – The Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 provided for three cycles of climate change adaptation planning grants that have been allocated to local and regional agencies for adaptation planning. Climate change adaptation aims to anticipate and prepare for climate change impacts to reduce the damage from climate change and extreme weather events. This funding is intended to advance adaptation planning on California’s transportation infrastructure, including but not limited to roads, railways, bikeways, trails, bridges, ports, and airports.

Local Development-Intergovernmental Review Branch

The LD-IGR Branch guides Caltrans statewide coordinators to be consistent and responsible in complying with state planning policies, executive mandates, Federal and California Codes and Statutes, such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and the California Streets and Highways Codes. The goal of the program is to support safety to the traveling public and freight movement, and provide quality services to stakeholders through public engagement, advance multimodal mobility and accessibility outreach, and education through application of sustainable practices and integrating strategies to enhance livability and economic prosperity for every Californian.

Major branch deliverables:

Geo-based Tracking System (GTS) Tool The GTS is LD-IGR’s centralized statewide database that captures, stores, and retrieves documentation and allows multiple users to add, update, and query projects simultaneously. This data driven database documents and maps local development programs, plans, projects, and various documents.

Transportation Impact Study Guide (TISG)

The Transportation Impact Study Guide (TISG), is a guidance document that explores the fundamental transportation analyses that are necessary in developing a multi-modal analysis for a program, plan, or project. Estimated Time of Deliverable Spring 2020.

Local Development Review Guide (LDRG)

The Companion to the 2020 TISG is the Local Development Review Guide (LDRG), Which includes the 21 required CEQA elements to be addressed. The LDRG is a “step-by-step” guide that prepares Caltrans staff how to review and proceed with a transportation analysis document. This guide shows staff to confidently review and compose a letter from functional unit subject matter expert comments. Estimated Time of Deliverable Spring 2020.

LD-IGR Desk Reference Guidance Manual

Development of LD-IGR Desk Reference Guidance Manual (Manual) is a “how to execute” document. The Manual guides Caltrans staff on processes and procedures for the Local Development and Intergovernmental Review Program. Estimated Time of Deliverable Spring of 2021.

Contacts:

Reza Navai, Assistant Division Chief, DOTP

reza.navai@dot.ca.gov

(916) 654-3330

Tracey Frost, Office Chief, OSMCC

tracey.frost@dot.ca.gov

(916) 654-8175

Ann Mahaney, Branch Chief, Smart Mobility and Active Transportation Branch

ann.mahaney@dot.ca.gov

(916) 653-4097

Julia Biggar, Branch Chief, Climate Change Branch

julia.biggar@dot.ca.gov

(916) 654-6344

Christian Bushong, Branch Chief, Local Development - Intergovernmental Review Branch

christian.bushong@dot.ca.gov

(916) 653-0548

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