Strategic Planning

California Freight Mobility Plan (CFMP)

The California Freight Mobility Plan (CFMP) is being updated presently to include guidance for freight investment funding through 2025.  Per Assembly Bill 14 (Lowenthal) and the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, Caltrans in collaboration with the California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA) are required to update a state freight plan every 5-years beginning December 31st, 2014.  The federal FAST Act authorizes $305 billion over 5-years through the National Highway Freight Program along with state SB 1 funds to improve the nation's surface transportation, infrastructure, including our roads, bridges, transit system, and freight rail network.

The Secretary of CalSTA assigned responsibility for drafting the California Freight Mobility Plan to the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in consultation with the California Freight Advisory Committee (CFAC) formed in compliance with AB 14. 

Sustainable Freight Action Plan (CSFAP)

At the direction of Governor Brown's Executive Order B-32-15 executed in July 2015, the California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA), California Natural Resource Agency and the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) are leading a team of related departments in the development of an integrated action plan by July 2016 that establishes clear targets by July 2016 to improve freight efficiency, transition to zero-emission technologies, and increase the competitiveness of California’s economy.

The lead agencies have developed an interagency group that includes the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the California Air Resources Board (ARB), California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development (Go-Biz), who are to initiate work this year on corridor-level freight pilot projects focused on integrating advanced technologies, alternative fuels, freight fuel infrastructure, and opportunities for local economic development along California's primary trade corridors.

Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP)

The Trade Corridor Enhancement Program provides an ongoing source of state funding dedicated to freight-related projects by establishing the new Trade Corridor Enhancement Account (TCEA). The TCEA will provide approximately $300 million per year in state funding for projects which more efficiently enhance the movement of goods along corridors that have a high freight volume. Subsequent legislation (SB 103), combined the Trade Corridor Enhancement Program funds with existing federal freight funding.  More information may be found here.

Office of Freight Planning

Goods movement is a complex, decentralized, dynamic network of systems – a mixture of public and private infrastructure, carriers and shippers, planning and regulatory bodies, public involvement, and other players interacting at global, national, regional, and local scales.

California is a major gateway and hub in terms of international trade on a global scale. The State’s large population and market size also create huge domestic demands within its own borders. While goods movement activities are critical in terms of jobs and the economy, freight movement may also have adverse effects on infrastructure, communities, and the environment.

International Border Studies

Freight planning for the California-Mexico International Border Area requires special considerations, not only for the busy land POEs and access highways, but also for freight transported through the Port of San Diego and by regional and national rail lines. Caltrans coordinates on goods movement projects and initiatives with its government counterparts in Mexican transportation planning agencies, along with other U.S. local and regional transportation agencies, state and federal agencies, and many other stakeholders on both sides of the border.

Caltrans freight planning in the border region is led by the District 11 International Border Studies Branch (IBSB), with support from Caltrans headquarters Office Freight Planning.

The IBSB’s mission is to reduce congestion and to improve mobility in California’s international transportation network and POEs. Services provided by IBSB include:

  • Coordination among regional transportation partners;
  • Policy advocacy for border study issues;
  • Transportation planning studies and initiatives;
  • Integration of goods movement needs into system planning studies;
  • Support to other governmental entities involved with U.S.-Mexico border transportation issues, such as the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and
  • Participation on binational coordination planning working groups.

Regional Goods Movement Activities

Overview

Many regional planning partners, such as Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies (RTPAs), develop freight plans, convene goods movement task forces, conduct studies, and include goods movment elements in their long-range transportation plans. These activities have contributed immensely to California's goods movement knowledge-base. Some of these efforts and resources are listed below.

North State

The North State Transportation for Economic Development Study (PDF) makes a case for ongoing investments in the 16-county North State Super Region and presents a robust discussion about the role of transportation and its potential to stimulate economic activity by connecting people, goods, services, and resources.

Central Valley

A Caltrans District 3 Goods Movement Study, which covers the 11-county Sacramento Valley region, is currently underway. It will encompass system condition analysis, project listings, project prioritization methodology, recommendations, and implementation strategies.

The Sacramento Area Council of Governments’ (SACOG) Goods Movement web page contains information on their Goods Movement Advisory Group and the SACOG Regional Goods Movement Report (2006-2007).

The extensive 2013 San Joaquin Valley Interregional Goods Movement Plan (PDF) provides a description of the existing freight infrastructure, which lays the foundation for analysis of economic and demographic trends in freight flows and the system’s capability to support anticipated growth in the eight-county San Joaquin Valley region.

Central Valley

A Caltrans District 3 Goods Movement Study, which covers the 11-county Sacramento Valley region, is currently underway. It will encompass system condition analysis, project listings, project prioritization methodology, recommendations, and implementation strategies.

The Sacramento Area Council of Governments’ (SACOG) Goods Movement web page contains information on their Goods Movement Advisory Group and the SACOG Regional Goods Movement Report (2006-2007).

The extensive 2013 San Joaquin Valley Interregional Goods Movement Plan (PDF) provides a description of the existing freight infrastructure, which lays the foundation for analysis of economic and demographic trends in freight flows and the system’s capability to support anticipated growth in the eight-county San Joaquin Valley region.

San Francisco Bay Area

The Caltrans District 4-lead 2014 San Francisco Bay Area Freight Mobility Study (PDF) provides rich information regarding the nine-county region’s current multimodal goods movement system. In addition to discussing the system’s role, commodities, functions, traffic implications, needs, impacts, and performance measures, the study also recommends strategies and projects that would benefit Bay Area freight movement.

The Bay Area Goods Movement Collaborative, lead by Alameda County Transportation Commission (CTC), is a diverse group of Bay Area region stakeholders, community members, and partners organized to better understand goods movement needs and to identify, prioritize and advocate for short- and long-term strategies to address those needs.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and Alameda CTC are jointly developing a long-range Countywide Goods Movement Plan and a Regional Goods Movement Plan, which will ensure consistency between the documents and reach a wider range of stakeholders. For more information about these plans and other initiatives, please visit the Alameda CTC and MTC goods movement websites.

Central Coast

The 2012 Central Coast California Commercial Flows Study, prepared for the Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments (AMBAG) in alliance with several regional agencies, details the region’s commodity flows, issues, needs, and deficiencies.

San Diego and Border Region

The San Diego Association of Governments’ (SANDAG) Freight web page contains information on their freight system projects, plans, studies, and other efforts. SANDAG also has a web page related to United States-Mexico Border Coordination.

The SANDAG Freight Stakeholders Working Group meets as needed to provide input for the development of three major freight planning efforts.