California Department of Transportation
 
 

Antioch Bridge
The original Antioch Bridge, a two-lane lift span, was the first toll bridge built across a San Francisco Bay tributary. Opened in 1926, this structure was built by Aven Hanford and Oscar Klatt, the owners of the Carquinez Bridge. They undoubtedly built both crossings to protect their investments against the possible competition of a free bridge. The old bridge was only 21 feet wide and vehicles over 5 tons could not exceed 15 miles per hour. The lift span was raised an average of 95 times a month for passing ships. Even in the raised position, the opening was too narrow for comfortable passage, especially in dense delta fog. Ship collisions nearly collapsed the bridge in 1958, 1963 and 1970.

This bridge is not undergoing any current seismic retrofit work nor is there any new construction. This site has no pages dedicated to the Antioch Bridge. The history above was taken from District 4's web site. For additional information on the Antioch Bridge, click here.

Benicia-Martinez Bridge
Located 30 miles north east of San Francisco, the Benicia-Martinez Bridge has been determined to be a Lifeline bridge in an event of a disaster. This link will show the various activities associated with the Benicia-Martinez Bridge, including contracts, photos, and other links related to the bridge.

Carquinez Bridge
Built in 1927, the Carquinez Bridge was built by two grocers to transport goods from Solano County to Contra Costa County. This link will show the various activities associated with the Carquinez Bridge, including contracts, photos, and other links related to the bridge.

Dumbarton Bridge
The original Dumbarton Bridge, which opened on January 15, 1927, was the first vehicular crossing over the San Francisco Bay. Requiring only 1.2 miles of over-the-water structure, it crossed the narrowest neck of the bay between the present day cities of Menlo Park on the west shore and Newark on the east shore.

Built by the Dumbarton Bridge Company for $2.5 million, the original structure was a combination of truss spans and trestle. The lift span was made of lightweight concrete. Safety hazards and traffic congestion related to the lift span prompted efforts to re-build the bridge. The State purchased the bridge for $2.26 million in 1951.

This bridge is not undergoing any current seismic retrofit work nor is there any new construction. This site has no pages dedicated to the Dumbarton Bridge. The history above was taken from District 4's web site. For additional information on the Dumbarton Bridge.

Richmond-San Rafael Bridge
Completed in 1956, the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is part of Interstate 580 spanning beween the City of Richmond and the City of San Rafael. This link will show the various activities associated with the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, including contracts, photos, and other links related to the bridge.

San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge
The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge carries about 280,000 vehicles a day. It is being retrofited to meet life line service standards which means the bridge should be available for use by emergency response vehicles after a major earthquake. This link will show the various activities associated with the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, including contracts, photos, the retrofit of the West Span and the New East Span. Links related to this bridge can also be found on this page.

San Mateo-Hayward Bridge
Completed in 1967, the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge carries 77,000 vehicles a day. This link will show the various activities associated with the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge, including contracts, photos, and other links related to the bridge.

For comments and questions regarding this web site, contact the webmaster at DTB_Webmaster_Dist04@dot.ca.gov .