California Department of Transportation

Email Contacts:

Mailing Address:

Department of Transportation
Division of TSI, MS #38
P.O. Box 942874
Sacramento, CA 94272-0001

FAX: 654-6583
Calnet 8-464-6583

FHWA Logo

Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) Federal Program

HPMS is a federally mandated inventory system and planning tool, designed to assess the nation's highway system. HPMS is used as a management tool by State and Federal governments and local agencies to analyze the system's condition and performance.

HPMS History

Click to expand and collapse answer panel

HPMS is a cooperative data/analytical effort dating from the late 1970s that involves the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and State and local governments. The HPMS includes a statistically drawn sample of more than 100,000 highway sections containing data on current physical and operating characteristics, as well as projections of future travel growth on a section-by-section basis. All HPMS data are provided to FHWA through State DOTs from existing State or local government databases or transportation plans and programs, including those of metropolitan planning organizations.

The Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) has been a highly successful federal-state partnership for over 30 years. This program helps measure the investment accountability of vast amounts of public funds; provides a wide variety of information to Congress for formulating federal-aid highway programs and making decisions on program funding; and serves the highway data and analytical needs of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the transportation community, business, industry, and the general public.

HPMS was created to solve a problem. In 1965, Congress directed FHWA to report biennially on the conditions, performance, and future highway investment needs of the nation's street and highway systems. This mandate was really a challenge since most available statistical data at that time were fragmented, archaic, and incomplete. As a result, several unique national studies were developed and implemented over a 10-year period beginning in 1968. Because each study required the states to assemble a significant staff to meet FHWA's study objectives and data reporting requirements, this approach to fulfilling the congressional mandate was not a practicable solution. Therefore, HPMS was created in 1978 as a continuing, sample-based monitoring program that requires annual data reporting instead of biennial special studies.

More Information:

 

What is HPMS Used For?

Uses for Highway Performance Monitoring System data

Click to expand and collapse answer panel
  • Allocation of Federal Funds to the States. Federal and State policies.
  • Travel trends and future transportation forecasts.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality conformity tracking.
  • Data for Biennial Report to Congress on the State of the Nation's Highways.
 

HPMS Authority is Based Upon Federal Code

E.P.A Section 187 - clean air act

Click to expand and collapse answer panel

EPA Section 187 - Clean Air Act 42 U.S. Code § 7512a - Plan submissions and requirements

Calls for States/MPOs having URBANIZED AREAS affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 to estimate total annual vehicular highway travel (Vehicle Miles Traveled or VMT) using the HPMS.(a) Moderate Areas: Each State in which all or part of a Moderate Area is located shall, with respect to the Moderate Area (or portion thereof, to the extent specified in guidance of the Administrator issued before November 15, 1990), submit to the Administrator the State implementation plan revisions (including the plan items) described under this subsection, within such periods as are prescribed under this subsection, except to the extent the State has made such submissions as of November 15, 1990:

  1. (1) Inventory No later than 2 years from November 15, 1990, the State shall submit a comprehensive, accurate, current inventory of actual emissions from all sources, as described in section 7502 (c)(3) of this title, in accordance with guidance provided by the Administrator.
  2. (2) (A) Vehicle miles traveled (A) (A) Vehicle miles traveled No later than 2 years after November 15, 1990, for areas with a design value above 12.7 ppm at the time of classification, the plan revision shall contain a forecast of vehicle miles traveled in the nonattainment area concerned for each year before the year in which the plan projects the national ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide to be attained in the area. The forecast shall be based on guidance which shall be published by the Administrator, in consultation with the Secretary of Transportation, within 6 months after November 15, 1990. The plan revision shall provide for annual updates of the forecasts to be submitted to the Administrator together with annual reports regarding the extent to which such forecasts proved to be accurate. Such annual reports shall contain estimates of actual vehicle miles traveled in each year for which a forecast was required. (B) Special rule for Denver Within 2 years after November 15, 1990, in the case of Denver, the State shall submit a revision that includes the transportation control measures as required in section 7511a (d)(1)(A) of this title except that such revision shall be for the purpose of reducing CO emissions rather than volatile organic compound emissions. If the State fails to include any such measure, the implementation plan shall contain an explanation of why such measure was not adopted and what emissions reduction measure was adopted to provide a comparable reduction in emissions, or reasons why such reduction is not necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide.
  3. (3) Contingency provisions No later than 2 years after November 15, 1990, for areas with a design value above 12.7 ppm at the time of classification, the plan revision shall provide for the implementation of specific measures to be undertaken if any estimate of vehicle miles traveled in the area which is submitted in an annual report under paragraph (2) exceeds the number predicted in the most recent prior forecast or if the area fails to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide by the primary standard attainment date. Such measures shall be included in the plan revision as contingency measures to take effect without further action by the State or the Administrator if the prior forecast has been exceeded by an updated forecast or if the national standard is not attained by such deadline.
  4. (4) Savings clause for vehicle inspection and maintenance provisions of the State implementation plan
  5. Immediately after November 15, 1990, for any Moderate Area (or, within the Administrator's discretion, portion thereof), the plan for which is of the type described in section 7511a (a)(2)(B) of this title any provisions necessary to ensure that the applicable implementation plan includes the vehicle inspection and maintenance program described in section 7511a (a)(2)(B) of this title.
  6. (5) Periodic inventory No later than September 30, 1995, and no later than the end of each 3 year period thereafter, until the area is redesignated to attainment, a revised inventory meeting the requirements of subsection (a)(1) of this section.
  7. (6) Enhanced vehicle inspection and maintenance No later than 2 years after November 15, 1990, in the case of Moderate Areas with a design value greater than 12.7 ppm at the time of classification, a revision that includes provisions for an enhanced vehicle inspection and maintenance program as required in section 7511a (c)(3) of this title (concerning serious ozone nonattainment areas), except that such program shall be for the purpose of reducing carbon monoxide rather than hydrocarbon emissions.
  8. (7) Attainment demonstration and specific annual emission reductions

In the case of Moderate Areas with a design value greater than 12.7 ppm at the time of classification, no later than 2 years after November 15, 1990, a revision to provide, and a demonstration that the plan as revised will provide, for attainment of the carbon monoxide NAAQS by the applicable attainment date and provisions for such specific annual emission reductions as are necessary to attain the standard by that date.

The Administrator may, in the Administrator's discretion, require States to submit a schedule for submitting any of the revisions or other items required under this subsection. In the case of Moderate Areas with a design value of 12.7 ppm or lower at the time of classification, the requirements of this subsection shall apply in lieu of any requirement that the State submit a demonstration that the applicable implementation plan provides for attainment of the carbon monoxide standard by the applicable attainment date. (b) Serious Areas

  • (1) In general Each State in which all or part of a Serious Area is located shall, with respect to the Serious Area, make the submissions (other than those required under subsection (a)(1)(B) [1] of this section) applicable under subsection (a) of this section to Moderate Areas with a design value of 12.7 ppm or greater at the time of classification, and shall also submit the revision and other items described under this subsection.
  • (2) Vehicle miles traveled Within 2 years after November 15, 1990, the State shall submit a revision that includes the transportation control measures as required in section 7511a (d)(1) of this title except that such revision shall be for the purpose of reducing CO emissions rather than volatile organic compound emissions. In the case of any such area (other than an area in New York State) which is a covered area (as defined in section 7586 (a)(2)(B) of this title) for purposes of the Clean Fuel Fleet program under part C of subchapter II of this chapter, if the State fails to include any such measure, the implementation plan shall contain an explanation of why such measure was not adopted and what emissions reduction measure was adopted to provide a comparable reduction in emissions, or reasons why such reduction is not necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide.
  • (3) Oxygenated gasoline (A) Within 2 years after November 15, 1990, the State shall submit a revision to require that gasoline sold, supplied, offered for sale or supply, dispensed, transported or introduced into commerce in the larger of— (i) the Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget) (CMSA) in which the area is located, or (ii) if the area is not located in a CMSA, the Metropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget) in which the area is located, be blended, during the portion of the year in which the area is prone to high ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide (as determined by the Administrator), with fuels containing such level of oxygen as is necessary, in combination with other measures, to provide for attainment of the carbon monoxide national ambient air quality standard by the applicable attainment date and maintenance of the national ambient air quality standard thereafter in the area. The revision shall provide that such requirement shall take effect no later than October 1, 1993, and shall include a program for implementation and enforcement of the requirement consistent with guidance to be issued by the Administrator. (B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the revision described in this paragraph shall not be required for an area if the State demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Administrator that the revision is not necessary to provide for attainment of the carbon monoxide national ambient air quality standard by the applicable attainment date and maintenance of the national ambient air quality standard thereafter in the area. (c) Areas with significant stationary source emissions of CO (1) Serious Areas In the case of Serious Areas in which stationary sources contribute significantly to carbon monoxide levels (as determined under rules issued by the Administrator), the State shall submit a plan revision within 2 years after November 15, 1990, which provides that the term "major stationary source" includes (in addition to the sources described in section 7602 of this title) any stationary source which emits, or has the potential to emit, 50 tons per year or more of carbon monoxide. (2) Waivers for certain areas The Administrator may, on a case-by-case basis, waive any requirements that pertain to transportation controls, inspection and maintenance, or oxygenated fuels where the Administrator determines by rule that mobile sources of carbon monoxide do not contribute significantly to carbon monoxide levels in the area. (3) Guidelines Within 6 months after November 15, 1990, the Administrator shall issue guidelines for and rules determining whether stationary sources contribute significantly to carbon monoxide levels in an area. (d) CO milestone (1) Milestone demonstration By March 31, 1996, each State in which all or part of a Serious Area is located shall submit to the Administrator a demonstration that the area has achieved a reduction in emissions of CO equivalent to the total of the specific annual emission reductions required by December 31, 1995. Such reductions shall be referred to in this subsection as the milestone. (2) Adequacy of demonstration A demonstration under this paragraph shall be submitted in such form and manner, and shall contain such information and analysis, as the Administrator shall require. The Administrator shall determine whether or not a State's demonstration is adequate within 90 days after the Administrator's receipt of a demonstration which contains the information and analysis required by the Administrator. (3) Failure to meet emission reduction milestone If a State fails to submit a demonstration under paragraph (1) within the required period, or if the Administrator notifies the State that the State has not met the milestone, the State shall, within 9 months after such a failure or notification, submit a plan revision to implement an economic incentive and transportation control program as described in section 7511a (g)(4) of this title. Such revision shall be sufficient to achieve the specific annual reductions in carbon monoxide emissions set forth in the plan by the attainment date. (e) Multi-State CO nonattainment areas (1) Coordination among States Each State in which there is located a portion of a single nonattainment area for carbon monoxide which covers more than one State ("multi-State nonattainment area") shall take all reasonable steps to coordinate, substantively and procedurally, the revisions and implementation of State implementation plans applicable to the nonattainment area concerned. The Administrator may not approve any revision of a State implementation plan submitted under this part for a State in which part of a multi-State nonattainment area is located if the plan revision for that State fails to comply with the requirements of this subsection. (2) Failure to demonstrate attainment If any State in which there is located a portion of a multi-State nonattainment area fails to provide a demonstration of attainment of the national ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide in that portion within the period required under this part the State may petition the Administrator to make a finding that the State would have been able to make such demonstration but for the failure of one or more other States in which other portions of the area are located to commit to the implementation of all measures required under this section (relating to plan submissions for carbon monoxide nonattainment areas). If the Administrator makes such finding, in the portion of the nonattainment area within the State submitting such petition, no sanction shall be imposed under section 7509 of this title or under any other provision of this chapter, by reason of the failure to make such demonstration. (f) Reclassified areas Each State containing a carbon monoxide nonattainment area reclassified under section 7512 (b)(2) of this title shall meet the requirements of subsection (b) of this section, as may be applicable to the area as reclassified, according to the schedules prescribed in connection with such requirements, except that the Administrator may adjust any applicable deadlines (other than the attainment date) where such deadlines are shown to be infeasible. (g) Failure of Serious Area to attain standard
  • If the Administrator determines under section 7512 (b)(2) of this title that the national primary ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide has not been attained in a Serious Area by the applicable attainment date, the State shall submit a plan revision for the area within 9 months after the date of such determination. The plan revision shall provide that a program of incentives and requirements as described in section 7511a (g)(4) of this title shall be applicable in the area, and such program, in combination with other elements of the revised plan, shall be adequate to reduce the total tonnage of emissions of carbon monoxide in the area by at least 5 percent per year in each year after approval of the plan revision and before attainment of the national primary ambient air quality standard for carbon monoxide.
 

23 CFR 420.105(b) - Data Reporting Responsibilities

Click to expand and collapse answer panel

Complete Statute:

(b) The State DOTs must provide data that support the FHWA's responsibilities to the Congress and to the public. These data include, but are not limited to, information required for: preparing proposed legislation and reports to the Congress; evaluating the extent, performance, condition, and use of the Nation's transportation systems; analyzing existing and proposed Federal-aid funding methods and levels and the assignment of user cost responsibility; maintaining a critical information base on fuel availability, use, and revenues generated; and calculating apportionment factors.

 

23 CFR 460.3(b) - Cirtification of Public Road Mileage

Click to expand and collapse answer panel

Complete Statute:

(b) State public road mileage. Each State must annually submit a certification of public road mileage within the State to the Federal Highway Administration Division Administrator by the date specified by the Division Administrator. Public road mileage on Indian reservations within the State shall be identified and included in the State mileage and in computing the State's apportionment.

 

23 CFR 500.204(b) - TMS components for highway traffic data

Click to expand and collapse answer panel

23 CFR 500.204(b)

(b) Precision of reported data. Traffic data supplied for the purposes identified in §500.203(a) of this subpart shall be to the statistical precision applicable at the time of the data's collection as specified by the data users at various levels of government. A State's TMS shall meet the statistical precisions established by FHWA for the HPMS.

 
Page updated on August 20, 2014