Alphabetical Listing of TMDL Areas-------------------------------------------------------------

Ballona Creek Established TMDLs Ballona Creek Trash TMDL

The Ballona Creek Trash TMDLs became effective on August 28, 2002. Caltrans is proceeding with Trash TMDL Implementation Projects, which are to retrofit Gross Solid Removal Devices (GSRDs) at the existing drainage outfalls in the rights-of-way. Table A lists those Trash TMDL Implementation Projects that are either in construction or completed. Any projects that overlap within the limits of freeway corridors listed in Table A are not required to consider GSRDs for those overlapping limits. However, Project Engineers shall consider placing infiltration basins or media filters as much as possible in lieu of GSRDs at existing and proposed drainage systems.

Table A

PM

Status

EA

Route

From

To

Status

226611

405

30.31

36.15

completed

226711

60

2.7

6.6

completed

226711

710

22.5

23.8

completed

2266A1

5

27.62

28.15

completed

2266A1

10

9.02

13.82

completed

2266A1

90

1.84

2.70

completed

2267A1

10

5.59

8.80

completed

2267A1

91

10.25

13.88

completed

2267A1

105

8.25

13.15

completed

2267A1

110

21.65

23.61

completed

231311

2

15.40

21.46

completed

231311

101

7.21

7.21

completed

231311

170

14.78

19.92

completed

231311

134/710

13.34

13.34

completed

231311

210

22.73

23.88

completed

231311

405

25.46

29.41

completed

235901

5

16.35

16.35

completed

235901

101

12.70

26.50

completed

235901

134

0.00

9.86

completed

Ballona Creek Metals TMDL and the Ballona Creek Estuary Toxic Pollutants TMDL

The Ballona Creek Metals TMDL and the Ballona Creek Estuary Toxic Pollutants TMDL became effective on January 11, 2006. Caltrans is participating in a group of Responsible Agencies working collaboratively toward compliance of the TMDLs. Targeted pollutants are Total Cu, Pb, Zn and Se for Metals TMDL and Cu Pb, Zn, Ag, Chlordane, DDTs, Total PCBs and Total PAHs in the sediments of Ballona Creek Estuary (Estuary Toxic Pollutants TMDL). Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Total Maximum Daily Loads for Bacterial Indicator Densities in Ballona Creek, Ballona Estuary, & Sepulveda

Channel

The Total Maximum Daily Loads for Bacterial Indicator Densities in Ballona Creek, Ballona Estuary, & Sepulveda Channel requires the Responsible Agencies including Caltrans to reduce number of exceedance days of bacteria concentrations in the Ballona Creek, Ballona Estuary and Sepulveda Channel. The TMDL became effective April
27, 2007. Caltrans is working in a group of Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL

The Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL became effective on March 20, 2012. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans, to reduce amount of trash and plastic pellets in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection (MFAC) Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs

The Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs was adopted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDL assigns waste load allocations for DDT and PCB to the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans. Caltrans will be working with other Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Ballona Creek Wetlands

Established TMDL

Ballona Creek Wetlands Sediment and Invasive Exotic Vegetation

The Ballona Creek Wetlands Sediment and Invasive Exotic Vegetation Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) was adopted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDL assigns waste load allocations on sediment discharges and input of invasive exotic vegetation to the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans. In addition, the TMDL requires the cooperative parties, including Caltrans to remove legacy sediment deposit in the Wetlands. The waste load allocation and load allocation are “zero” for invasive exotic vegetation species rated as “high” or “moderate” on the California Invasive Plant Council’s Plant Inventory (CAIPC). Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Beardsley Wash and Revolon Slough (Calleguas Creek)

Established TMDL

Beardsley Wash and Revolon Slough Trash TMDL

The Beardsley Wash and Revolon Slough Trash became effective on March 6, 2008. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce amount of trash deposited in the waterbody and in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Calleguas Creek

Established TMDLs

Calleguas Creek Nitrogen Compounds and Related Effects TMDL

The Calleguas Creek Nitrogen Compounds and Related Effects TMDL became effective July 16, 2003. The TMDL requires the Calleguas Creek Watershed Management Plan Subcommittees to submit a Monitoring Work Plan and complete several special studies including planning and preparation of construction for TMDL remedies
to reduce Nitrogen loads. Caltrans is actively participating in the Subcommittee and working toward compliance of the TMDL. Targeted Pollutants are Ammonia, NO3-N, NO2-N, and NO3-N+NO2-N.The Department's monitoring data depicts Caltrans discharges to be below the TMDL limits, thus no additional measures are needed to be considered for meeting the conditions of the Nitrogen TMDL.

Calleguas Creek Watershed OC Pesticides and PCBs TMDL and the Calleguas Creek Watershed

Toxicity, Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon TMDL

The Calleguas Creek Watershed OC Pesticides and PCBs TMDL and the Calleguas Creek Watershed Toxicity, Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon TMDL became effective March 24, 2006. Targeted Pollutants are Chlordane, 4,4-DDD,
4,4- DDE, 4,4-DDT, Dieldrin, PCBs, and Toxaphene for Pesticides, and Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon for Toxicity. Caltrans is working cooperatively with other Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL requirements.
Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm
Water Coordinator.

Calleguas Creek Watershed Metals and Selenium TMDL

The Calleguas Creek Watershed Metals and Selenium TMDL became effective March 26, 2007. The TMDL assigns waste load allocations to the Permitted Stormwater Dischargers (PSD) that include the Municipal Storm Water (MS4) Permittees, Caltrans and others. The PSD are required to achieve the final dry and wet weather waste load allocations in 15 years. Caltrans is working with a group of Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Targeted pollutants are Copper (Cu), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni), Zinc (Zn) and Selenium (Se). Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Total Maximum Daily Load for Boron, Chloride, Sulfate, and TDS (Salts) in the Calleguas Creek Watershed

The TMDL for Chloride, Sulfate, and TDS (Salts) in the Calleguas Creek Watershed became effective December
2, 2008. The TMDL assigns interim and final Dry Weather waste load allocations (WLA) to the Permitted Stormwater Dischargers (PSD) for Chloride, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), sulfate and Boron. The PSD are required to achieve the interim WLAs in a progressive manner and to meet the final WLAs in 15 years. Caltrans is not named in the TMDL.

Colorado Lagoon

Established TMDL

Colorado Lagoon OC Pesticide, PCBs, Sediment Toxicity, PAHs, and Metals TMDL

The Colorado Lagoon OC Pesticide, PCBs, Sediment Toxicity, PAHs, and Metals TMDL became effective on July
28, 2011. Caltrans, along with City of Long Beach, is required to mitigate pollutant loadings in the runoff from Line I Storm Drain due to drainage from State Route LA-1, Pacific Coast Highway. Targeted pollutants are Chlordane, Dieldrain, Pb, Zn, PAHs, PCBs and DDTs. Caltrans is exploring partnership opportunities with City of Long Beach to implement join treatment projects. Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Dominguez Channel

Established TMDL

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL became

effective on March 23, 2012. Targeted pollutants are copper, lead, zinc, PAH, DDT, PCBs, Benzopyrene and
Dieldrin for water column in the channel and harbors, and for sediments in the harbors. The TMDL requires the dischargers of the Los Angeles River and the San Gabriel River to monitor water quality at the mouth of each
River. Caltrans will participate in groups of agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Harbor Beaches of Ventura County (Channel Islands Harbor)

Established TMDL

Harbor Beaches of Ventura County Bacteria TMDL

The Harbor Beaches of Ventura County Bacteria TMDL became effective on December 18, 2008. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce exceedances of indicator bacteria in the waterbody to the numeric targets in five (5) or ten (10) years. Caltrans will be working with other Responsible Agencies to collaboratively comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator

Legg Lake

Established TMDL

Legg Lake Trash TMDL

The Legg Lake Trash TMDL became effective on March 6, 2008. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce amount of trash deposited in the waterbody and in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Los Angeles Lakes Nutrients, Metals and Toxics Total Maximum Daily Loads

The Los Angeles Lakes Nutrients, Metals and Toxics Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) were adopted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDLs assign waste load allocations to the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans, for nutrients, metals and toxics pollutants in 10 small lakes in the Los Angeles County area. The State Routes are only in the drainage area of the following 5 lakes: Peck Road Park Lake, Echo Park Lake, Legg Lake, Puddingstone Reservoir, and Lake Sherwood. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Los Cerritos Channel

Established TMDL

Los Cerritos Channel metals TMDL

The Los Cerritos metals TMDL was adopted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 17,
2010. The TMDL assigns dry weather Copper and wet weather Copper, Lead and Zinc mass-based waste load allocations (g/day) to the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce amount of metals in the waterbody.
Caltrans is proceeding with a TMDL project to implement treatment BMPs in the watershed and is collaborating
with other Responsible Agencies to comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Los Angeles Area Small Lakes

Established TMDL



Los Angeles Area Lakes Nutrients, Metals Toxics and Trash, Total Maximum Daily Loads
The Los Angeles Area Lakes Nutrients, Metals Toxics and Trash, Total Maximum Daily Loads were adopted by
the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDLs assign waste load allocations

to the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans, for nutrients, metals, toxics, and trash pollutants in 10 small lakes in the Los Angeles County area. The State Routes are only in the drainage area of the following 5 lakes: Peck Road Park Lake, Echo Park Lake, Legg Lake, Puddingstone Reservoir, and Lake Sherwood. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water
Coordinator.

Los Angeles/ Long Beach Harbors

Established TMDL

The Los Angeles Harbor Bacteria TMDL (Inner Cabrillo Beach and Main Ship Channel)

The Los Angeles Harbor Bacteria TMDL (Inner Cabrillo Beach and Main Ship Channel) became in effect March
10, 2005. Caltrans is not a responsible party.

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL became effective on March 23, 2012. Targeted pollutants are copper, lead, zinc, PAH, DDT, PCBs, Benzopyrene and Dieldrin for water column in the channel and harbors, and for sediments in the harbors. The TMDL requires the dischargers of the Los Angeles River and the San Gabriel River to monitor water quality at the mouth of each River. Caltrans will participate in groups of agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Los Angeles River

Established TMDLs

Los Angeles River Trash TMDL

The Los Angeles River Trash TMDL became effective August 28, 2002. Caltrans is proceeding with Trash TMDL Implementation Projects, which are to retrofit Gross Solid Removal Devices (GSRDs) at the existing drainage outfalls in the rights-of-way. Table A lists those Trash TMDL Implementation Projects that are either in construction or completed. Any projects that overlap within the limits of freeway corridors listed in Table A are not required to consider GSRDs for those overlapping limits. However, Project Engineers shall consider placing infiltration basins or media filters as much as possible in lieu of GSRDs at existing and proposed drainage systems.

Table A

PM

Status

EA

Route

From

To

Status

226611

405

30.31

36.15

completed

226711

60

2.7

6.6

completed

226711

710

22.5

23.8

completed

2266A1

5

27.62

28.15

completed

2266A1

10

9.02

13.82

completed

2266A1

90

1.84

2.70

completed

2267A1

10

5.59

8.80

completed

2267A1

91

10.25

13.88

completed

2267A1

105

8.25

13.15

completed

2267A1

110

21.65

23.61

completed

231311

2

15.40

21.46

completed

231311

101

7.21

7.21

completed

231311

170

14.78

19.92

completed

231311

134/710

13.34

13.34

completed

231311

210

22.73

23.88

completed
231311

405

25.46

29.41

completed

235901

5

16.35

16.35

completed

235901

101

12.70

26.50

completed

235901

134

0.00

9.86

completed

Los Angeles River Nitrogen Compounds and Related Effects TMDL

The Los Angeles River Nitrogen Compounds and Related Effects TMDL became effective March 23, 2004. The TMDL requires the Storm Water NPDES Permittees to submit a Monitoring Work Plan by March 23, 2005 to estimate nitrogen loadings associated with runoff from the storm drain systems. County of Los Angeles has submitted the Monitoring Work Plan as required on behalf of Caltrans and other Storm Water NPDES Co- Permittees in the watershed. Targeted pollutants are Total ammonia as nitrogen (NH3-N), Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3- N), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2-N), and Nitrate nitrogen plus nitrite-nitrogen (NO3-N + NO2-N).The Department's monitoring data depicts Caltrans discharges to be below the TMDL limits, thus no additional measures are needed to be considered for meeting the conditions of the Nitrogen TMDL.

Los Angeles River and Tributaries Metals TMDL

The Los Angeles River and Tributaries Metals TMDL became effective on January 11, 2006. Caltrans will work with 5 groups of Responsible Agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Targeted Pollutants are total Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Se. Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District
NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria in the Los Angeles River

The Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria in the Los Angeles River became effective on March 23,
2012. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans, to reduce number of exceedance days of bacteria concentrations in the Los Angeles River and achieve waste load allocations in 25 years. Caltrans will be working with groups of Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL became

effective on March 23, 2012. Targeted pollutants are copper, lead, zinc, PAH, DDT, PCBs, Benzopyrene and Dieldrin for water column in the channel and harbors, and for sediments in the harbors. The TMDL requires the dischargers of the Los Angeles River and the San Gabriel River to monitor water quality at the mouth of each River. Caltrans will participate in groups of agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Los Angeles River Estuary

Established TMDL

Long Beach City Beaches and Los Angeles River Estuary Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria

The Long Beach City Beaches and Los Angeles River Estuary Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria was adopted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies such as City of Long Beach and Caltrans to reduce number of exceedance days of bacteria concentrations at Long Beach City Beaches and in the Los Angeles River Estuary. The State Routes discharge into the Los Angeles River Estuary only. There is no State Routes in the drainage areas of the Long Beach City Beaches. Caltrans will be working with City of Long Beach and other Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Marina del Rey Harbor

Established TMDLs

The Marina del Rey Harbor Mother's Beach and Back Basins Bacteria TMDL

The Marina del Rey Harbor Mother's Beach and Back Basins Bacteria TMDL became effective March 18, 2004. Caltrans is working cooperatively with other responsible agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Marina del Rey Harbor Toxic Pollutants TMDL

The Marina del Rey Harbor Toxic Pollutants TMDL became effective on March 22, 2006. Targeted pollutants are Copper, Lead, Zinc, Chlordane and Total PCBs in sediments of the Back Basins and Total PCBs in water column and fish tissue. Caltrans is working cooperatively with other Responsible Agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Project Engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Machado Lake

Established TMDLs

Machado Lake Trash TMDL

The Machado Lake Trash TMDL became effective on March 6, 2008. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce amount of trash deposited in the waterbody and in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Machado Lake Nutrient TMDL

The Machado Lake Nutrient TMDL became effective on March 11, 2009. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans, to reduce amount of nutrients in the Machado Lake, in terms of Total Phosphorus, Total Nitrogen, Ammonia – N, Dissolved Oxygen and Chlorophyll a and to meet interim waste load allocations in five (5) years and final waste load allocations in nine and a half (9.5) years. Caltrans is working cooperatively with the other Responsible Agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

TMDL for Pesticides and PCBs for Machado Lake

The TMDL for Pesticides and PCBs for Machado Lake became effective on March 20, 2012. Targeted pollutants are Total PCBs, DDT, DDE, DDD, Total DDT, Chlordane and Dieldrin in the suspended sediments. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans, to implement actions to reduce pollutants loadings by weight and achieve the final waste load allocations by September 30, 2019. Caltrans will be working cooperatively with other Responsible Agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Malibu Creek

Established TMDLs

Malibu Creek Watershed Bacteria TMDL

The Malibu Creek Watershed Bacteria TMDL became effective on January 24, 2006. Caltrans is working cooperatively with a group of Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Malibu Creek Watershed Trash TMDL

The Malibu Creek Trash TMDL became effective on July 7 2009. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies,

including Caltrans to reduce amount of trash deposited in the waterbody and in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water

Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL

The Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL became effective on March 20, 2012. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans, to reduce amount of trash and plastic pellets in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection (MFAC) Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs

The Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs was adopted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDL assigns waste load allocations for DDT and PCB to the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans. Caltrans will be working with other Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Middle Santa Ana River (Region 8)

Future TMDL

The Bacterial Indicator TMDL for Middle Santa Ana River Watershed Waterbodies

The Bacterial Indicator TMDL for Middle Santa Ana River Watershed Waterbodies was adopted by the Santa Ana
Regional Water Quality Control Board (Region 8). The TMDL is anticipated to become effective in the near future.

Miscellaneous Ventura Coastal Watersheds - Oxnard Subwatershed

Note: There are 4 coastal subwatersheds grouped under the Miscellaneous Ventura Coastal Watersheds, Pitas Point, Buenaventura, Oxnard and Ventura Coastal Streams Subwatersheds. These subwatersheds are physically independent from one and other (see pdf maps). Oxnard is the only subwatershed that currently has an established TMDL - the Total Maximum Daily Loads for Santa Clara River Estuary/Surfers' Knoll, McGrath State Beach, and Mandalay Beach Coliform and Beach Closures.

Established TMDL

The Total Maximum Daily Loads for Santa Clara River Estuary/Surfers' Knoll, McGrath State Beach, and

Mandalay Beach Coliform and Beach Closures

The Total Maximum Daily Loads for Santa Clara River Estuary/Surfers' Knoll, McGrath State Beach, and
Mandalay Beach Coliform and Beach Closures. Caltrans is not a responsible party in the TMDL.

San Gabriel River

Established TMDLs

The Trash TMDL for the East Fork of San Gabriel River

The Trash TMDL for the East Fork of San Gabriel River has been in effect since April 17, 2001. Caltrans is not a responsible party.

San Gabriel River and Impaired Tributaries Metals and Selenium TMDL

The San Gabriel River and Impaired Tributaries Metals and Selenium TMDL was approved by the United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2007. The TMDL assigns Dry Weather waste load allocations (WLA) to MS4 Permittees and Caltrans for copper in San Gabriel River Estuary, Reach 1 and Coyote Creek, and for Selenium in San Jose Creek Reaches 1 & 2, The TMDL assigns Wet Weather WLA to MS4
Permittees and Caltrans for lead in San Gabriel Reach 2 and upstream reaches and tributaries, and for copper, lead and zinc in Coyote Creek and its tributaries. Caltrans will be working with groups of Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL

Dominguez Channel and Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbor Waters Toxic Pollutants TMDL became effective on March 23, 2012. Targeted pollutants are copper, lead, zinc, PAH, DDT, PCBs, Benzopyrene and Dieldrin for water column in the channel and harbors, and for sediments in the harbors. The TMDL requires the dischargers of the Los Angeles River and the San Gabriel River to monitor water quality at the mouth of each River. Caltrans will participate in groups of agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project engineers shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Clara River

Established TMDLs

The Upper Santa Clara River Chloride TMDL, Santa Clara River Nitrogen Compounds TMDL and the Total Maximum Daily Loads for Santa Clara River Estuary/Surfers' Knoll, McGrath State Beach, and Mandalay Beach Coliform and Beach Closures

The Upper Santa Clara River Chloride TMDL, Santa Clara River Nitrogen Compounds TMDL and the Total Maximum Daily Loads for Santa Clara River Estuary/Surfers' Knoll, McGrath State Beach, and Mandalay Beach Coliform and Beach Closures are in effect. Caltrans is not a responsible party in all three TMDLs.

Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria in the Santa Clara River Estuary and Reaches 3,5,6 and 7

The Total Maximum Daily Loads for Indicator Bacteria in the Santa Clara River Estuary and Reaches 3,5,6 and 7 became effective on March 21, 2012. Caltrans is identified as a Non-MS4 Permittee. The TMDL requires Caltrans and other non-MS4 permit, upon effective of the TMDL, to comply with the Waste Load Allocations (WLA) of zero “0” exceedance day for both Dry and Wet Weather, and for Geometric Mean in the Santa Clara River Estuary and targeted reaches. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay

Established TMDLs

Dry Weather Bacteria TMDL for the Santa Monica Bay Beaches and Wet Weather Bacteria TMDL for the Santa

Monica Bay Beaches

The Dry Weather Bacteria TMDL for the Santa Monica Bay Beaches focuses on storm drain flows during summer and winter dry weathers. Caltrans is in compliance with the TMDL. The Wet Weather Bacteria TMDL for the Santa Monica Bay Beaches outlines 7 Jurisdiction Groups in the Santa Monica Bay coastal watersheds and assigns a Primary Responsible Jurisdiction and the Additional Responsible Jurisdictions and Agencies to each Jurisdiction Group. Caltrans participates in the Jurisdiction Groups as an Additional Responsible Agency and is working cooperatively with other Responsible Agencies toward compliance of the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL

The Santa Monica Bay Nearshore and Offshore Debris TMDL became effective on March 20, 2012. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans, to reduce amount of trash and plastic pellets in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection (MFAC) Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs

The Santa Monica Bay Total Maximum Daily Load for DDT and PCBs was adopted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) on March 26, 2012. The TMDL assigns waste load allocations for DDT and PCB to the Responsible Agencies in the Santa Monica Bay, Ballona Creek and Malibu Creek Watersheds, including Caltrans. Caltrans will be working with other Responsible Agencies to jointly comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Ventura River Estuary

Established TMDL

Ventura River Estuary Trash TMDL

The Ventura River Estuary Trash TMDL became effective on March 6, 2008. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce amount of trash deposited in the waterbody and in the storm water discharges to “zero” in eight (8) years. Responsible Agencies may implement a Minimum Frequency of Assessment and Collection Program in or adjacent to the waterbody or place full capture devices at the drainage outfalls. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.

Ventura River

Established TMDL

Ventura River and Tributaries Algae, Eutrophic Conditions, and Nutrients TMDL

Ventura River and Tributaries Algae, Eutrophic Conditions, and Nutrients TMDL became effective June 28, 2013. The TMDL requires the Responsible Agencies, including Caltrans to reduce the waste loads of Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorus (TP) in the discharges and receiving water. The Responsible Agencies and Caltrans shall meet the wet weather waste loads upon effective of the TMDL and meet the dry weather waste loads in six (6) years from the effective date of the TMDL. Caltrans will work with other Responsible Agencies to jointly

comply with the TMDL. Project Engineer shall consider treatment controls for the project and consult with the

District NPDES Storm Water Coordinator.